James Stewart Clelland

Welsh Regiment

Personal Details

Born: In 1890 in Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland.

Family: He was the eldest child born to Andrew McLaren Clelland, a bread vanman, and his wife Margaret (nee Stewart). He had at least one sister, Margaret; identification of further siblings has not been possible due to the unavailability of Scottish records. There is a 1914 electoral register record for a James S Clelland living at 184 Slatefield Street, Glasgow (this may relate to the right man). In 1915 he married Dorothy Muriel Whiston in Whitchurch, Shropshire and together they had two daughters, Janet and Sheila.

Residence: In 1891 he was living with his family in Cubie Street, Camlachie, Glasgow. By 1901 the family had moved to 32 Lochiel Street, Camlachie, Glasgow. His military medal card showed an address of Ryecroft, Belton Road, Whitchurch; this was his address at the time of his death.

Employment: It is possible that he was a postman in 1914.

Died: 24 January 1922 in Whitchurch and was buried on 28 January the same year in Whitchurch cemetery.

Military Details

Regiment: Welsh Regiment (previously Highland Light Infantry)

Rank: Second Lieutenant (Corporal in Highland Light Infantry)

Service Number: 14129 in Highland Light Infantry

Date of Enlistment: Not known

Date of Discharge: Not known

Reason for Discharge: Not known

Other Information: He was admitted to a field hospital in France in 1917, and then to a hospital ship, with trench fever.

Medals and Awards

James was awarded the Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals

Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.


 

Oscar Stafford Bamber

King's Liverpool Regiment

Personal Details

Born: 19 November 1892 in Picton, New South Wales, Australia.

Family: He was the eldest of seven children born to William Bamber, a cheese factor and his wife Eva May (nee Stafford). He married Alice Beatrice Smith in 1919 in Chester. The couple had a daughter, Joan, born in 1921.

Residence: In 1901 his family were living in Grindley Brook, near Whitchurch, Shropshire. By 1911 they had moved to 48 Station Road, Whitchurch. His address in 1939 was 5 Brook Road, Whitchurch. This continued to be his home until his death in 1974.

Employment: In 1911 he was a clerk in his father`s business and by 1939 a cheese manufacturer and factor.

Died: On 13 October 1974 at the Royal Shrewsbury Hospital, Shrewsbury, Shropshire and buried 17 October the same year in Whitchurch cemetery.

Military Details

Regiment: King`s Liverpool Regiment (previously the Territorial Force)

Rank: Private

Service Number: 256459 (previously 4981)

Date of Enlistment: 17 July 1915

Date of Discharge: 15 March 1919

Reason for Discharge: Disembodied on Demobilisation

Other Information: His brother, Roy Marston Bamber also served in WW1. He was taken prisoner of war on 30 November 1917 at Ephey and repatriated a year later, arriving at Dover on 22 November 1918.

Medals and Awards

Oscar was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals

Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.


 

John Bernard Coggins

Information received from Mike Coggins 03/03/2021

My father, John Bernard Coggins b 5 June 1899 in Blackburn, 6 Bn South Wales Borderers (Pioneers) attended an Instructors Anti-Gas course at Prees Heath between 12 Sep 1918 to the 20 September 1918. At that time he was a LCpl. He was awarded a First Class Certificate of Instructor.

42nd (Anti-Gas) Western Command Centre, Prees Heath.

He was lectured by Capt Douglas, Capt Laithwaite and 2 Lt Hild.

His notes, about 120 pages, with beautiful coloured crayon drawings & diagrams are in a book which about 20 years ago I indefinitely loaned, with his WW1 medals, to Winterbourne Gunner where they undertake the NBC Instructors Courses. They typed up his notes and use them as an introduction to their current course. The course notes can be accessed on my FB Page and also on the Western Front Association website. Frank Baldwin, who recently retired as Chair of the Battlefields Trust, also used/uses his notes, particularly the coloured diagrams, on Sandhurst Cadets tour of the WW1 battlefields.

To view the notebook visit Mike’s facebook page

Incidentally, you are probably wondering my age. I am 62.

Once this current malaise is over I intend to visit the Brecon Museum as they have records of where he was in hospital. He was shot in the neck and gassed (probably chlorine) as he fell into a trench where barbed wire ripped off his gas mask. This was in a counter attack on Ploegsteert on the 10 April 1918. He was a private at that time. He was dragged out by a French Canadian to a first aid casualty station.

Tags:

George Billingsley

Border Regiment

Personal Details

Born: 2 March 1869 in Stockton, Shropshire and baptised on 21 March the same year in Stockton parish church.

Family: He was the seventh of eight children born to Thomas Billingsley, an agricultural labourer, and his wife Emma. No marriage can be located for George.

Residence: At the time of his baptism his family were living at Apley Farm Cottages, Stockton. In 1871 and 1881 he was living with his family in Worfield, Bridgnorth, Shropshire. He was serving with the military in 1891 and 1901. His WW1 military records show his sister living in Painters Green, Whitchurch, Shropshire and his discharge to her address; in 1911 he was boarding at 62 Wistaston Road, Monks Coppenhall, Cheshire.

Employment: He was a labourer when he enlisted in 1889. Between 1903 and 1905 he worked as a labourer for London and North Western Railways. In 1911 he was a railway clerk.

Died: 1 April 1922 in Whitchurch, aged 52.

Military Details

Regiment: Border Regiment

Rank: Company Sergeant Major

Service Number: 35772

Date of Enlistment: 9 November 1914

Date of Discharge: 15 October 1918

Reason for Discharge: No longer physically fit for war service

Other Information: George enlisted in the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry in 1889 (number B70354), serving until 1902, including in the Boer War.

Medals and Awards

George was awarded the Silver War Badge (number 2962)

Silver War Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.



 

John Barnett Joyce

Coldstream Guards

Personal Details

Born: 9 August 1890 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 29 August the same year in St. Alkmund’s Parish Church, Whitchurch and known as Jack.

Family: He was the third of six children born to Arthur Joyce, a clockmaker, and his wife Jessie. He married Dorothy E Owen in 1938 in Shrewsbury, Shropshire; no children can be traced for the marriage.

Residence: From the time of his baptism until at least 1891 he was living with his parents and siblings in Chester Road, Whitchurch. The 1901 census shows their address as 40 High Street, Whitchurch and by 1911 they had moved to The Beeches, Chester Road, Whitchurch. ‘Joyce of Whitchurch Clockmakers 1690 – 1965’ records that he emigrated to Canada, joining the Royal North West Mounted Police in April 1912, serving with the force in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba until July 1914. He returned to the UK aboard the SS Missanabie, arriving at Liverpool on 24 January 1915. In 1917 when he was discharged from the army his address was 44 Station Road, Whitchurch (This was the address of his mother who by this time had been divorced from his father). In 1939 he was living at Sandford House, St Julian’s Friars, Shrewsbury.

Education: He was admitted to Whitchurch Boys Grammar School on 17 September 1900.

Employment: He was a clockmaker by trade, joining the family firm of J B Joyce & Co Ltd, rising to director and leaving them in 1923.

Died: In 1941 in Shrewsbury, aged 50.

Military Details

Regiment: Coldstream Guards

Rank: Private

Service Number: 15679

Date of Enlistment: 8 March 1915

Date of Discharge: 23 February 1917

Reason for Discharge: No longer physically fit for war service

Other Information: He suffered gunshot wounds to his left knee. His brother, Arthur Bernard, was killed in action in 1917. His other two brothers, Horace William and Norman, also served in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Jack was awarded the Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals) and the Silver War Badge (number 32992)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Silver War Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.



 

Norman Joyce

King's Shropshire Light Infantry

Personal Details

Born: 23 August 1891 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 28 October the same year in St. Alkmund’s Parish Church, Whitchurch. Norman had a twin brother Arthur Bernard. Norman was named in the civil birth, marriage and death records as William Rossall Joyce, but baptised as and known as Norman Joyce.

Family: He was the fourth child (with his twin brother) of Arthur Joyce, a clockmaker, and his wife Jessie. He married Margaret Nunnerley in 1920; together they had one child Dorothy Betty.

Residence: At the time of his baptism the family were living in Chester Road, Whitchurch. By 1890 they had moved to 40 High Street, Whitchurch and in 1911 they were living at The Beeches, Chester Road, Whitchurch. In 1939 he was living at 32 Station Road, Whitchurch and at the time of his death at Thornleigh, Station Road, Whitchurch (these are likely to be the same property).

Employment: He was a clockmaker.

Died: 27 December 1966 in Whitchurch.

Military Details

Regiment: King’s Shropshire Light Infantry

Rank: Corporal

Service Number: 200170 (previously 1473)

Date of Enlistment: Not known

Date of Discharge: Not known

Reason for Discharge: Not known

Other Information: His twin brother Arthur Bernard was killed in action in 1917. His other two brothers, Horace William and John Barnett, also served in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Norman was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals) and the Territorial Force War Medal

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Territorial Force War Medal


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Territorial Force War Medal was a campaign medal awarded to members of the British Territorial Force and Territorial Force Nursing Services who served overseas in World War I; it is the rarest of the five British Great War medals.

The medal was established in April 1920 for award to members of the Territorial Force and Territorial Force Nursing Services who volunteered for service overseas on or before 30 September 1914, and served overseas. They had to have been serving with the force on 4 August 1914 or have completed four years service with the force before 4 August 1914 and rejoined the force on or before 30 September 1914.



 

Thomas Mayor Parker

Royal Army Veterinary Corps

Personal Details

Born: 26 November 1866 in Wigan, Lancashire.

Family: He was the fourth of nine children born to Thomas Parker, a grocer, and his wife Elizabeth. He married Gwendolen Williamson (nee Thomas) in 1915 in Nantwich, Cheshire and together they had one child Massie Mayor.

Residence: In 1871 he was living with his family in Lime Street, Wigan. By 1881 the family had moved to 97 Scholes Street, Wigan and in 1891 Thomas was boarding at The Groves, High Street, Malpas, Cheshire. In 1911 he lived at 7 New Street, Whitchurch which may have been his veterinary practice. In 1939 he and his wife were living at Warren House, Prees Heath, Shropshire. At the time of his death he was living at 23 Dodington, Whitchurch.

Employment: He was a veterinary surgeon.

Died: 18 January 1946 in Whitchurch, and was buried on 22 January the same year in Whitchurch cemetery.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Army Veterinary Service

Rank: Acting Major

Service Number: 

Date of Enlistment: Not known

Date of Discharge: Not known

Reason for Discharge: Not known

Other Information: Thomas served in the Boer War.

Medals and Awards

Thomas was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Ernest Samuel Povah

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 15 September 1883 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the son of William Povah and his wife Mary, nee Pace. He married Harriet Jean Easton in Canada. They had a daughter, Dorothy.

Residence: In 1891 he was living with his grandparents at 1 New Street, Whitchurch, Shropshire. He continued to live there until at least 1901. He emigrated to Canada in 1910 and in 1911 he was living at 211 Metcalfe, Ottawa, Ontario. When he enlisted in 1916 his address was Edison Avenue, Westboro, Ontario. At the time of his death in 1919 his home was 14 Chamberlain Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario.

Employment: In 1901 he was an ironmonger`s apprentice. By 1910 he had emigrated to  Canada and was employed as a janitor. In 1916 his occupation was a hardware salesman.

Died: 25 October 1919 at Mowat Sanatorium, Kingston, Ontario, aged 36.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force 

Rank: Private

Service Number: 246419

Date of Enlistment: 2 June 1916

Date of Discharge: 9 August 1916

Reason for Discharge: Medically unfit.

Other Information: On his Attestation documents he stated that he had served with the 53rd Shropshire Regiment King’s Shropshire Light Infantry for seven years and three years in the British Navy, but no military records can be found for him.

Medals and Awards

Ernest was not eligible for any medals.

 

Edwin Morris Venables

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 11 April 1870 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised 8 June the same year at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the third of nine children born to William Venables, a grocer and his wife, Sarah Lucy, nee Hughes. He married Alberta Elizabeth Berney on 24 December 1900 in Winchester, Manitoba, Canada. The couple had four children, William Edwin, Evelene Beatrice, Lily May and Dorothy Lucy.

Residence: In 1871 his family were living in High Street, Whitchurch, Shropshire and in 1881 in Venables Yard, Whitchurch. He emigrated to Canada in 1885/6. In 1901 he and his wife were living in Brandon, Manitoba and between 1906 and 1911 their home was in Boissevain, Souris, Manitoba. In 1921 he was living in Sprague, Provencher, Manitoba.

Employment: In 1901 he was a farmer and in 1906 an agent in a lumber yard. On his enlistment in 1915 his occupation was a salesman, however on the 1921 Census he was a farmer.

Died: 15 November 1925 in Sprague, Manitoba, aged 55.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force 

Rank: Lance Corporal

Service Number: 151984

Date of Enlistment: 29 July 1915

Date of Discharge: 7 December 1918

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

Edwin was awarded the Victory Medal

Victory Medal


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as ‘Wilfred’) was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal (‘Squeak’) also received the Victory Medal (‘Wilfred’). However, in general, all recipients of ‘Wilfred’ also received ‘Squeak’ and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as ‘Pip’) also received both ‘Squeak’ and ‘Wilfred’. The recipient’s service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.


 

Christopher Riley

Royal Flying Corps

Personal Details

Born: 4 December 1896 in Ash, Shropshire.

Family: He was the fifth of six children born to John Riley, a chauffeur (later a farmer in Canada) and his wife Helena Annie, nee Ely. He married Caroline Emily Marsh on 22 December 1928 in Spokane, Washington State, U.S.A. The couple had a daughter, Elizabeth Jean.

Residence: In 1901 his family were living in Ash Parva, Ash, Shropshire. They emigrated to Canada in March 1903. By 1911 their home was in Yale and Cariboo, British Columbia. In 1930 and now married, he and his wife were living at 5528 Dorchester Avenue, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. At the time of his death he was living in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Employment: At the time of his Attestation in 1917 he was a student.

Died: 23 March 1969 in Vancouver, British Columbia, aged 72.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Flying Corps. (previously Canadian Expeditionary Force (British Columbia Regiment))

Rank: Aviator Cadet (previously Private)

Service Number: 172563 (previously 2138582)

Date of Enlistment: 24 October 1917

Date of Discharge: 24 December 1918

Reason for Discharge: Being surplus to R.A.F. requirements

Other Information: His brother, William John, also served with the Canadian Expeditionary Force during WW1.

Medals and Awards

Christopher was awarded the Victory Medal

The Victory Medal


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as ‘Wilfred’) was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal (‘Squeak’) also received the Victory Medal (‘Wilfred’). However, in general, all recipients of ‘Wilfred’ also received ‘Squeak’ and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as ‘Pip’) also received both ‘Squeak’ and ‘Wilfred’. The recipient’s service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.


 

Robert Mainwaring Wynne-Eyton

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 12 January 1886 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised 19 February 1886 at St. Michael`s Parish Church, Marbury, Cheshire.

Family: He was the third of five children born to Colonel Charles Edward Wynne-Eyton and his wife Aline Mary, nee Wills. He married Leonora Bradfield, possibly in Nyasaland as no marriage record can be found in the UK records.

Residence: In 1891 his family were living at Plas Bellin Hall, Northop, Holywell, Flintshire. At the time of his enlistment in 1914 he was living in British Columbia, Canada. In the 1920s he was living in Nyasaland and at the time of his death in 1959 his home was Cape Town, Western Cape,South Africa.

Employment: In 1914 he was a rancher, in the 1920s a big game hunter and in 1938 a planter.

Died: 8 September 1959 in Cape Town, South Africa.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Air Force (previously Royal Flying Corps, Machine Gun Corps, Royal Naval Auxiliary Service and Canadian Expeditionary Forces)

Rank: Flight Commander (at the end of his service)

Service Number: 107759 (Canadian Expeditionary Force)

Date of Enlistment: 16 November 1914

Date of Discharge: 23 January 1919

Reason for Discharge: Transferred to unemployed list

Other Information: He was wounded on active service in Salonica in 1917. In 1918 he was reported missing, taken prisoner in the Netherlands and repatriated on 15 November 1918.

Medals and Awards

Robert was awarded the Military Cross (London Gazette 1 January 1918) and Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals). He was also Mentioned in Dispatches.

Military Cross


Military_Cross

The Military Cross is the third-level military decoration awarded to officers and (since 1993) other ranks of the British Armed Forces, and used to be awarded to officers of other Commonwealth countries.
The Military Cross is granted in recognition of "an act or acts of exemplary gallantry during active operations against the enemy on land to all members, of any rank in Our Armed Forces". In 1979, the Queen approved a proposal that a number of awards, including the Military Cross, could be awarded posthumously.

Click on the tag below to see details of each recipient.



Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Thomas Cappur Rolfe

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 2 August 1887 in Halghton, Hanmer, Flintshire and baptised on 28 August 1887 at Hanmer Parish Church.

Family: He was the sixth of seven children born to Samuel Gardiner Rolfe, a joiner and his wife Mary Ann, nee Gardner. He married Blanche Closson on 15 December 1920 in Indian Head, Saskatchewan, Canada. The couple had three children, Thomas John, George Edward and Margaret.

Residence: From the time of his baptism in 1887 until at least 1901 his family were living at Tarts Hill, Halghton, Hanmer. It is possible that he emigrated to Canada in 1906. In 1921 and now married, he was living  at Indian Head, Qu`Appelle, Saskatchewan. His family was still there in 1926.

Employment: When he enlisted in 1915 he gave his occupation as a gardener. In 1921 he was a farmer.

Died: 9 October 1952, aged 65 and buried in the Veterans Garden, Regina Cemetery, Regina, Saskatchewan.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Machine Gun Corps.)

Rank: Sergeant

Service Number: 104941

Date of Enlistment: 22 September 1915

Date of Discharge: 26 March 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

Thomas was awarded the Military Medal (London Gazette 2 April 1918) and Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals)

His Military Medal citation read: “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on January 22nd 1918. Under an intense bombardment the enemy attempted to raid our lines. L/Cpl Rolfe’s number 1 on his machine gun opened up, and maintained a heavy fire on the two parties of the enemy, breaking up their attack and forcing them to retire. Throughout the action he displayed great coolness and courage and set a splendid example to his men.“

Military Medal


Until 1993, the Military Medal (MM) was a military decoration awarded to personnel of the British Army and other services, and formerly also to personnel of other Commonwealth countries, below commissioned rank, for bravery in battle on land.
The medal was established on 25 March 1916. It was the other ranks' equivalent to the Military Cross (MC), which was awarded to commissioned officers and, rarely, to warrant officers, although WOs could also be awarded the MM. The MM ranked below the Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM), which was also awarded to non-commissioned members of the Army.
Click on the tags below to see details of each recipient.



Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

William John Riley

William John Riley

Personal Details

Born: 8 July 1886 in Ingatestone, Mountnessing, Essex and baptised on 25 July 1886 in Essex.

Family: He was the eldest of six children born to John Riley, a coachman (later a farmer in Canada) and his wife Helena Annie, nee Ely. He married Beatrice May Hood – Barrs on 29 April 1922 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The couple had a son, Michael born in 1923.

Residence: In 1891 his family were living at Broughall House Lodge, Broughall, Shropshire. By 1901 they had moved to Ash Wood Lane, Ash Parva, Shropshire. The family emigrated to Canada in 1903 and at the time of his Attestation in 1914 he gave an address of Celista, British Columbia. In 1921 his home was Celista, Shuswap Lake, Cariboo, British Columbia. He and his wife were living at 4495 Marine Drive East, Vancouver, British Columbia in 1935.

Employment: In 1914 he was a saddler and in 1921 a farmer. By 1935 he was a manager for an export company.

Died: 8 April 1937 in Vancouver, British Columbia, aged 50.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Railway Troop, previously 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles)

Rank: Acting Captain (previously Trooper)

Service Number: 107513

Date of Enlistment: 8 December 1914

Date of Discharge: 1 September 1920

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: In September 1916, whilst serving in France, he suffered a gunshot wound to his face. His brother Christopher, also served with the Canadian Expeditionary Force during WW1.

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the Military Cross (London Gazette 23 July 1918), Military Medal (London Gazette 6 January 1917) and bar (London Gazette 23 February 1918) and Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals)

His citation for his Military Cross reads: ‘ For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in attempting to save two 12 inch railway howitzers, and in saving a locomotive which would have fallen into the hands of the enemy. A number of breaks had to be repaired, and at one part of the journey the engine had to be taken over an 8 inch break in the rails. In spite of heavy machine gun and rifle fire he was successful, and the engine was then used to haul a trainload of material. He showed great courage under very trying conditions.’ The entry in the London Gazette reads: ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He kept the guns of the forward section in action under intense fire for seven hours, firing 800 rounds from two guns. He only retired when the enemy opened machine gun fire at 150 yards, first putting his guns out of actions, and getting his men away with a minimum of loss.’

His citation for his first Military Medal reads: ‘During the whole of operations from September 27th and 28th until relieved this NCO obtained valuable information, particularly by getting in touch with elements of the company on our right, when machine gun fire was most intense. About 6 pm on the afternoon of the 29th the right flank of A Company was ‘in the air’ and the enemy making every endeavour to force our block. It was seen that a gap connecting the Company right flank with elements of B Company was necessary, the position of either not being known to the other. Cpl Riley took a bundle of stakes and a shovel and under heavy rifle and machine gun fire staked out about seventy feet of trench, which was dug and consolidated thus ensuring the safety of our flank.’

Military Cross


Military_Cross

The Military Cross is the third-level military decoration awarded to officers and (since 1993) other ranks of the British Armed Forces, and used to be awarded to officers of other Commonwealth countries.
The Military Cross is granted in recognition of "an act or acts of exemplary gallantry during active operations against the enemy on land to all members, of any rank in Our Armed Forces". In 1979, the Queen approved a proposal that a number of awards, including the Military Cross, could be awarded posthumously.

Click on the tag below to see details of each recipient.



Military Medal


Until 1993, the Military Medal (MM) was a military decoration awarded to personnel of the British Army and other services, and formerly also to personnel of other Commonwealth countries, below commissioned rank, for bravery in battle on land.
The medal was established on 25 March 1916. It was the other ranks' equivalent to the Military Cross (MC), which was awarded to commissioned officers and, rarely, to warrant officers, although WOs could also be awarded the MM. The MM ranked below the Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM), which was also awarded to non-commissioned members of the Army.
Click on the tags below to see details of each recipient.



Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

John Furber

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 12 June 1890 in Prees, Shropshire and baptised at St.Chad`s Church, Prees.

Family: He was the younger of two sons born to Elizabeth Ann Furber. At the time of his birth she was unmarried. His mother subsequently married Thomas Bate and together they had nine surviving children, John’s half siblings. He was brought up by Joseph Hockenhull, an agricultural labourer and his wife, Hannah. He married Violet Ruth Emmaline Sutton on 23 September 1926 in Timiskaming, Ontario, Canada. Sadly the couple were only married for two months before he died. No children can be found for the couple.

Residence: In 1891 he was living in Hollins Lane, Tilstock, Shropshire and in 1901 in Alkington, near Whitchurch. He emigrated to Canada in 1913, arriving on 11 April. When he was discharged from the Army in 1919 his address was Cemetery Hill, New Liskeard, Ontario. At the time of his death in 1926 he was living in Timiskaming, Ontario.

Employment: At the time of his enlistment in 1915 his occupation was said to have been a labourer. On his return to Canada in 1920 he was a farm labourer. In 1926 he was a gold miner.

Died: 17 November 1926, as a result of an accident at Tough Dakes Mine. He died in Kirkland Lake Hospital, Timiskaming, Ontario, aged 36.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Machine Gun Corps.)

Rank: Sergeant

Service Number: 47858

Date of Enlistment: 28 May 1915

Date of Discharge: 12 April 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation in England

Medals and Awards

John was awarded the Military Medal (London Gazette 14 December 1917) and Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals)

His Military Medal citation read: 'For great presence of mind and gallantry on August 15 1917. This NCO showed remarkable courage and initiative in leading his crew and consolidating his position. He set his men a fine example during counter-attacks by his coolness and devotion to duty.’

Military Medal


Until 1993, the Military Medal (MM) was a military decoration awarded to personnel of the British Army and other services, and formerly also to personnel of other Commonwealth countries, below commissioned rank, for bravery in battle on land.
The medal was established on 25 March 1916. It was the other ranks' equivalent to the Military Cross (MC), which was awarded to commissioned officers and, rarely, to warrant officers, although WOs could also be awarded the MM. The MM ranked below the Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM), which was also awarded to non-commissioned members of the Army.
Click on the tags below to see details of each recipient.



Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

George Nunnerley

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 26 March 1887 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 11 October 1887 at St Alkmund`s Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the youngest of six children born to Thomas Nunnerley, a farmer and his wife Mary Ann, nee Pearson. He married Maggie Leslie Plumb on 2 August 1933 in Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. The couple had one child.

Residence: From the time of his baptism until at least 1911 his family were living at Bradeley Green, Wirswall, Whitchurch, Shropshire. An address of 16 Kitchener Court, McMillan Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada was given for him when he was discharged from the Army in 1919.

Employment: In 1911 he was a dairy manager and in 1914, a creamery manager.

Died: 11 October 1954 in Manitoba, Canada, aged 67.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Royal Canadian Dragoons)

Rank: Trooper

Service Number: 14516

Date of Enlistment: 24 September 1914

Date of Discharge: 28 February 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: His brother, Arthur, also served in WW1 and died of wounds in Belgium on 27 April 1915, aged 29. His brother, John Edward, served in the Boer War.

Medals and Awards

George was awarded the Campaign medals (1914 Star, Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

William Roberts

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 29 April 1889 in Moreton Say, Shropshire and baptised on 26 May 1889 in Moreton Say Parish Church.

Family: He was one of six surviving children born to Henry Roberts, an agricultural worker and his wife Martha. He married Mary Jane Stewart on 5 December 1915 in Gateshead, Co Durham. They had a daughter, Mary S, born in 1916 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Residence: In 1891 his family were living at New Street Lane, Moreton Say, Shropshire, but ten years later they had moved to Maerfield, Maer, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire. In 1911 the family were living at Mossfield Cottages, Whitchurch, Shropshire. He enlisted in Edmonton, Canada in 1915 and there is an address of Torryburn, St John, New Brunswick on his records. On his discharge from the army in 1919 he gave  his address as Mossfields Cottages, Whitchurch, Shropshire. It would appear from his records that he did not intend going back to Canada. However he returned to Canada on 31 December 1919 and emigrated to the United States of America on 24 September 1922; his last address in Canada was in St. John. He became a naturalised American on 29 March 1941 and was living at 165 Elm Street, Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts in 1942.

Employment: On his Attestation documents he gave his occupation as a farmer; in 1925 he was a machinist.

Died: Not known

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Army Service Corps.)

Rank:  Private

Service Number: 436207

Date of Enlistment: 6 January 1915

Date of Discharge: 30 June 1919

Reason for Discharge: Not known

Other Information: He suffered severe gunshot wound to his back in 1915, whilst serving in France.

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Frederick Maddock

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 4 November 1889 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 4 December 1889 at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the eldest of five surviving children born to Daniel Maddock, an engine cleaner and his wife Mary Ellen, nee Ray. He married Minnie Jane Brown on 24 May 1920 at St. Barnabas Church, Toronto, Ontario. Frederick and Minnie had seven children – Frederick Daniel (who was killed in action in WW2), Clifford, Gordon, Leslie, Maude, Viola and Shirley.

Residence: At the time of his baptism in 1889 his family were living in Bark Hill, Whitchurch but two years later they had moved to Green End, Whitchurch. In 1901 their address was 11 Egerton Road, Whitchurch. By 1919 he was living at 200 Christy Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. At the time of his death in 1942 his home was 397 Lawrence Street, Oshawa, Ontario.

Employment: In 1915 he was a labourer on the railroad. In 1942 he was a guard at a munitions plant.

Died: 10 April 1942 at Christie Street Hospital, Toronto and buried 13 April the same year at the Oshawa Union Cemetery, Oshawa, Ontario, aged 52.

Military Details

Regiment: 20th Battalion Canadian Expeditionary Force (1st Central Ontario Regiment)

Rank:  Private

Service Number: 58216

Date of Enlistment: 9 April 1915

Date of Discharge: 31 August 1917

Reason for Discharge: Permanently unfit

Other Information: In September 1916 he was blown up and buried by shell fire, leaving him unconscious, resulting in severe shell shock.

Medals and Awards

Frederick was awarded the Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

William Tims Fleet

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 25 July 1891 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the youngest of four children born to Joseph William Fleet, an ironmonger’s manager and his wife Elizabeth Helen, nee Tims. He married Jessie Alice Docker on 5 November 1925 in Penticton, British Columbia. No children can be found for the marriage.

Residence: On the 1891 Census his family were living in Alkington Road, Whitchurch. They were probably still living there when William was born in July of that year. By 1901 the family had moved to 183 Iffley Road, Cowley, Oxfordshire. William emigrated to Canada in 1909 and in 1911 he was living in Penticton, British Columbia. At the time of his death his home was in Grand Forks, British Columbia.

Employment: In 1911 he was a teamster and in 1914 a rancher. At the time of his death his occupation was a fruit inspector with the Dominion Department of Agriculture.

Died: 22 July 1948 in Grand Forks, British Columbia and buried on 26 July in the Lakeside Cemetery, Penticton, aged 56.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Mounted Rifles)

Rank: Lieutenant

Service Number: 107209

Date of Enlistment: 8 December 1914

Date of Discharge: 17 January 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: In March 1916 he became dangerously ill with scarlet fever, diphtheria and paralysis.

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Thomas William Higginson

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 18 August 1885 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the second of nine children born to Thomas Powell Higginson, a butcher and his wife Elizabeth. He married Mabel Michelhausen on 14 May 1915 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. They had one daughter, Shirley, born in 1923.

Residence: In 1891 he was living with his parents and siblings in Kirkdale Road, West Derby, Liverpool, Lancashire. By 1901 the family had moved to 27 Cleveden Street, Toxteth Park, Liverpool. The family emigrated to Canada in 1906. In 1916 he and his wife were living in Andras, Wetaskiwin, Alberta (although he was serving in Europe). By 1921 they had moved to 12006 87th Street, Edmonton, Alberta.

Employment: At the time of his Attestation in 1915 he was a draughtsman and in 1921 a bookkeeper.

Died: Not known.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force 

Rank: Private

Service Number: 432600

Date of Enlistment: 11 January 1915

Date of Discharge: 23 March 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: Before enlisting in the Canadian Expeditionary Force he had been in the Naval Reserve. His brother, Richard Henry (known as Harry), was killed in action in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Thomas was awarded the Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals) and the Canadian War Service Badge (number 237416)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Canadian War Service Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Canadian War Badge was awarded to members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) who served in the United Kingdom or at the front, and who, due to old age, wounds or sickness, had retired or relinquished their commissions or been honourably discharged.


 

William Ernest Taylor

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 18 July 1885 in Tushingham, Cheshire.

Family: He was the sixth of seven children born to Samuel Taylor, a coachman and his wife Ann. No marriage can be found for him.

Residence: In 1889 his family were living in Tushingham, Cheshire. By 1901 they had moved to Willey Moor, Tushingham. He emigrated to Canada in 1903 and in 1916 when he enlisted in the army his address was 478 Aikins Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba. He was included in the fourth US WW2 draft which meant that he was a US citizen and was living at 1215 Wilcox Avenue, Los Angeles, California.

Employment: In 1901 he was a gardener`s apprentice and in 1916, a shipper. In 1942 he was working for an ice cream company.

Died: 27 January 1948 in Los Angeles.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Army Service Corps.)

Rank: Private

Service Number: 461491

Date of Enlistment: 3 March 1916

Date of Discharge: 30 May 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals) and the Canadian War Service Badge (number 187550)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Canadian War Service Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Canadian War Badge was awarded to members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) who served in the United Kingdom or at the front, and who, due to old age, wounds or sickness, had retired or relinquished their commissions or been honourably discharged.


 

George Nicholls

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 8 February 1890 in Calverhall, Shropshire and baptised on 13 April 1890 at Holy Trinity Church, Calverhall.

Family: He was one of seven surviving children born to Benjamin Nicholls, a coachman and gardener and his wife Alice, nee Weaver. He married Louisa Emily Witherden in 1915 in Thanet, Kent and together they had a son Sidney G.. George married Ethel M Willett in 1940 in Crewe Cheshire. The couple already had five children, Dorothy, Joyce, Raymond, Robert and Maurice.

Residence: In 1891 and 1901 his family were living in Calverhall, Shropshire. He enlisted in Montreal but no address can be found for him during the time he was living in Canada. An address of 24 Beam Street, Nantwich Cheshire was written on his medal card. In 1939 he was living at 51 Manor Road North, Nantwich, Cheshire.

Employment: His occupation in Canada in 1914 was a teamster. By 1939 he was a labourer working on the railway.

Died: In 1975 in the Congleton and Crewe District, aged 84.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Field Artillery)

Rank: Bombardier

Service Number: 89963

Date of Enlistment: 16 March 1915 as George Weaver (previously 14 November 1914 as George Nicholls)

Date of Discharge: 14 July 1919 (previously 27 February 1915 as George Nicholls)

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation in England (previously as medically unfit)

Other Information: He originally enlisted as George Nicholls on 30 November 1914 but was discharged as medically unfit on 27 February 1915. He re-enlisted as George Weaver (his mother`s maiden name) on 16 March 1915.

Medals and Awards

George was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals) and the Canadian War Service Badge

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Canadian War Service Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Canadian War Badge was awarded to members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) who served in the United Kingdom or at the front, and who, due to old age, wounds or sickness, had retired or relinquished their commissions or been honourably discharged.


 

Colin Campbell Letheren

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 14 August 1898 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the fourth of six children born to Frederick John Letheren, a master tailor and his wife Nellie, nee Candlin. He married Lillian Leona Hammond on 26 January 1921 in York, Ontario, Canada. Having divorced his first wife he went on to marry Stella Golding Dawley on 4 March 1930 in York, Ontario. The couple had a two sons Glenn, born in 1932, and Keith.

Residence: In 1901 his family were living in Market Street, Oakengates, Priorslee, Shropshire. By 1906 their home was 39 Garden Lane, Chester, Cheshire. In 1907 the family emigrated to Canada and were living at 41 Durham Street, Guelph, Ontario in 1915. In 1921 and now married, his address was 221 Ridley Gardens, Parkdale, Ontario. By 1968 his home was Stewart Street, Halton, Oakville, Ontario.

Education: In 1906 he was attending Victoria Road School, Chester.

Employment: At the time of his Attestation in 1915 his occupation was a clerk, by 1921 a salesman for a magazine and in 1958 an insurance agent.

Died: Possibly 21 December 1971 in Halton, Oakville.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Field Artillery, Howitzer Brigade)

Rank: Gunner

Service Number: 329964

Date of Enlistment: 26 June 1915

Date of Discharge: 10 June 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: His brother Frederick Candlin Letheren also served with the Canadian forces in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Colin was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals) and the Canadian War Service Badge

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Canadian War Service Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Canadian War Badge was awarded to members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) who served in the United Kingdom or at the front, and who, due to old age, wounds or sickness, had retired or relinquished their commissions or been honourably discharged.


 

Thomas Crewe

Thomas Crewe

Personal Details

Born: 12 January 1886 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 3 February 1886 at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was one of nine surviving children born to William Crewe, a labourer in a foundry and his wife  Ann, nee Keefe. He married Esther Ann (Essie) Gray in 1908. The couple had eight children, Evelyn, Doris, Kathleen, Arthur, Helen, Phyllis, Hazel and Earl.

Residence: At the time of his baptism in 1886 his family were living in Tarporley Road, Whitchurch. By 1891 they had moved to Claypit Street, Whitchurch but ten years later they were living at Oddfellows Cottages, Smallbrook Road, Whitchurch. Thomas emigrated to Canada in 1905. From 1916 until at least 1948 his family were living at 89 Hart Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba. In 1951 he and his wife moved to Vancouver, British Columbia. In November 1954 they moved again to 2293 Woodlawn Street, Kelowna, British Columbia.

Employment: In 1901 he was a grocer`s errand boy. When he left the army in 1919 he joined the federal civil service, working in various occupations including a caretaker and elevator operator.

Died: 18 February 1955 at Kelowna General Hospital, Kelowna, British Columbia, aged 69.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force 

Rank: Private

Service Number: 461405

Date of Enlistment: 15 February 1916

Date of Discharge: 4 April 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: In October 1916, whilst serving in France, he was reported as missing but was found partially buried. As a result he suffered from shell shock. In 1918 he received gunshot wounds to both feet and his right arm. Three of his brothers, Arthur, George and Harry, and his uncle Charles also served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force during WW1.

Medals and Awards

Thomas was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals) and the Canadian War Service Badge (number 162436)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Canadian War Service Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Canadian War Badge was awarded to members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) who served in the United Kingdom or at the front, and who, due to old age, wounds or sickness, had retired or relinquished their commissions or been honourably discharged.


 

Harry Crewe

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: Henry, known as Harry, on 27 July 1879 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 13 August 1879 at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was one of nine surviving children born to William Crewe, a labourer and his wife Ann nee Keefe. He married Lillie Challenor in 1903 in Whitchurch, Shropshire. The couple had two daughters, Doris and Evelyn.

Residence: In 1881 his family were living at Chemistry, Whitchurch, Shropshire. In 1891 he was living at 44 Yardington, Whitchurch. His address in 1901 was 13 Foresters Terrace, Ruabon, Denbighshire. At the time of his attestation in 1915 he was living at Oak Street, Nanaimo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. This was still his family home in 1921. In 1930 they were living in Alsace Avenue, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A..

Employment: He enlisted in the Imperial Yeomanry in 1901 at which time he was a moulder working for WH Smith, ironfounders. After leaving the Army in 1902 he joined the London and North Western Railway Company as a labourer.  At the time of his enlistment in 1915 he was a teamster. By 1921 his occupation was a labourer.

Died: 10 May 1958 in Los Angeles, California, aged 79.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Pioneer Battalion)

Rank: Lance Corporal

Service Number: 102097

Date of Enlistment: 1 September 1915

Date of Discharge: 1 June 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: Harry served in the Boer War, as did his brother Frederick William. He received a gunshot wound to his leg whilst serving in France during WW1. His brothers Arthur, George and Thomas and his uncle Charles also served with the Canadian Expeditionary Force during WW1.

Medals and Awards

Harry was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals) and the Canadian War Service Badge (number 176139)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Canadian War Service Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Canadian War Badge was awarded to members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) who served in the United Kingdom or at the front, and who, due to old age, wounds or sickness, had retired or relinquished their commissions or been honourably discharged.


 

Charles Crewe

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 3 May 1879 in Whitchurch,Shropshire and baptised on 25 June 1879 at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was one of nine surviving children born to John Crewe, a labourer and his wife Margaret. He married Maud Alice Woodfine on 16 April 1900 in Wrexham, Denbighshire. The couple had four children, John Leslie, Gwendoline and twins Harry and Margaret.

At the time of his baptism and in 1881 his family were living in Chemistry, Whitchurch. By 1891 they had moved to 43 Yardington, Whitchurch. In 1901 and now married, his address was 108 King`s Mills Road, Wrexham, Denbighshire. Charles emigrated to Canada in 1907 and his wife and two children followed him in 1908. They settled in the Winnipeg area of Manitoba, living at a number of addresses including; 497 Boyd Street in 1911, 556 Mountain Avenue in 1916, 233 Bronx Street, Springfield in 1921 and 465 Oak View, Springfield in 1926. At the time of his death in 1936, his home was in St Boniface, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Employment: In 1900 he was a labourer; in 1901 he was an engine driver. In 1911 he was a night watchman at a brewery. By the time of his enlistment in 1916 his occupation was a railway checker.

Died: 7 March 1936 in St. Boniface, Winnipeg, Manitoba, aged 55.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force 

Rank: Private

Service Number: 874112

Date of Enlistment: 17 February 1916

Date of Discharge: 8 June 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: His son, John Leslie, also enlisted, but was discharged for being underage. His four nephews Arthur, George, Harry and Thomas also served in the Canadian Forces in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Charles was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals) and the Canadian War Service Badge (number 14906)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Canadian War Service Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Canadian War Badge was awarded to members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) who served in the United Kingdom or at the front, and who, due to old age, wounds or sickness, had retired or relinquished their commissions or been honourably discharged.


 

Arthur Crewe

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 26 October 1893 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 22 November 1893 at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was one of nine surviving children born to William Crewe, a labourer and his wife Ann, nee Keefe. He married Maud Eveline Mellor in 1918 in Whitchurch, Shropshire. The couple had two children, Eileen Anna and Frederick Arthur.

Residence: At the time of his baptism in 1893 his family were living in Newtown, Whitchurch. On both the 1901 and 1911 Census their address was Oddfellows Cottages (Terrace), Whitchurch. He appears to have emigrated to Canada in 1911. In 1921 he and his wife were living at 836 Swan Street, Nanaimo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Victoria seems to have been his home for the remainder of his life.

Employment: On the 1911 Census he was described as a newsboy. His occupation upon his Attestation in 1915 was given as a chauffeur. After leaving the Army in 1919 until he retired he was a waiter.

Died: 1 March 1960 in Victoria, British Columbia and buried in Hatley Memorial Gardens, Colwood, Victoria, aged 66.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (61st Battalion)

Rank: Private

Service Number: 461219

Date of Enlistment: 10 November 1915

Date of Discharge: 28 March 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: He sustained a gunshot wound to his head and hand whilst fighting in France. His brothers, George, Harry and Thomas and his uncle Charles also served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force during WW1.

Medals and Awards

Arthur was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals) and the Canadian War Service Badge (number 130272)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Canadian War Service Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Canadian War Badge was awarded to members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) who served in the United Kingdom or at the front, and who, due to old age, wounds or sickness, had retired or relinquished their commissions or been honourably discharged.


 

Allinson Elsdon Wyatt

Allinson Elsdon Wyatt

Personal Details

Born: 27 July 1895 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 20 September the same year at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the youngest of three children born to Thomas Henry Wyatt, an engineer and his wife Ada, nee Parry. He married Marion McIntosh Cook on 18 September 1923 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. The couple had two children, Yvonne and Tom.

Residence: At the time of his baptism in 1895 until at least 1911 his family were living at 178 Wrexham Road, Whitchurch, Shropshire. He and his mother seem to have emigrated to Canada in 1913. He gave an address of 715 Stanley Street, Nelson, British Columbia on his Attestation in 1914, however by 1919 that had changed to 542 Montreal Street, Victoria. This was still his address in 1921.

Employment: In 1909 he was apprenticed to a carriage builder; in 1914 he was a chauffeur, but by 1921 he was a brakesman on the railway. At the time of his death in 1972 his occupation was stated as a retired refrigeration repairman.

Died: 30 January 1972 at the Veterans` Hospital, Victoria, Canada, aged 76.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Infantry, 1st British Columbia Regiment)

Rank: Private

Service Number: 23455

Date of Enlistment: 22 September 1914

Date of Discharge: 2 June 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

Allinson was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Kathleen Emily Whitton

Kathleen Emily Whitton

Personal Details

Born: 25 July 1886 in Wybunbury, Cheshire and baptised on 20 August 1886 at Wybunbury Parish Church, Wybunbury, Cheshire.

Family: She was the youngest of six surviving children born to Charles Roper Whitton, an agent for cattle food and his wife Elizabeth Mary, nee Hewat. She did not marry.

Residence: In 1891 her family were living at Heathfield, Hatherton, Nantwich, Cheshire. By 1901 they had moved to 8 Pepper Street, Nantwich. No trace can be found of her in the 1911 Census but her parent`s address was 32 Edgeley Road, Whitchurch, Shropshire. She emigrated to the United States in 1913 and joined the Canadian Army Medical Corps in 1917 her address was given as 353 Bay Street, South Hamilton, Ontario, Canada but by June 1918 she gave an address of 316 Cherry Street, San Francisco, California.  On her United States Naturalisation documents in 1941 she was said to have resided at 22 East 91st Street, New York City, New York. Before her death in 1969 she had been living in Santa Cruz, California.

Employment: She was a nurse.

Died: In December 1969 in Worthing, Sussex.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Army Medical Corps.)

Rank: Nursing Sister

Service Number:

Date of Enlistment: 27 March 1917

Date of Discharge: 25 July 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

Kathleen was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Alfred James O’Neill

Alfred James O'Neill

Personal Details

Born: 13 March 1880 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the third of ten children born to Michael Joseph O`Neill and his wife Emily, nee Henshall. Alfred did not marry.

Residence: In 1881 his family were living in Chester Road, Whitchurch. Ten years later they had moved to Grindley Brook, Whitchurch. He and his family were still living there in 1901. His address on his attestation in 1916 was Swift Current, Saskatchewan, Canada. His address when discharged in 1919 was 460 Jarvis Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba. He emigrated to the United States of America on 19 February 1923 and was living at 819 Towne Avenue, Los Angeles, California. In 1941 he was living at 4334 Russell Avenue, Holywood, California and in 1942 he was living at 343 Santa Rosa Hotel, Los Angeles.

Employment: In 1901 he was a journeyman bricklayer. At the time of his enlistment in Canada in 1916 he was a labourer.

Died: 16 March 1961 in Los Angeles.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force  

Rank: Private

Service Number: 252336

Date of Enlistment: 3 March 1916

Date of Discharge: 12 May 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: His brother, Michael, also served in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Alfred was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

William James Mostyn

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: He was born James Worthington Mercer on 3 September 1887 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 28 October 1887 at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the eldest of seven children born to Walter Edward Mercer, a tailor and his wife Margaret, nee Worthington. He married Marie Jeanne Gabrielle Lotti between 1916 – 1919, though no marriage documentation can be found for this. The couple had five children, Jean Marie, James Albert, Frederick Frank, Walter and one other.

Residence: At the time of his baptism in 1887 his family were living in Claypit Street, Whitchurch, Shropshire. By 1891 they had moved to 85 Beech Street, Crewe, Cheshire. Ten years later they were at 501 Chorley Old Road, Bolton, Lancashire. When he enlisted in 1916 his address was GPO Saskatoon, Canada. At the time of his death his home was in New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada.

Employment: When he enlisted in Canada in 1916 he was a farmer. In 1940 he was a labourer.

Died: 21 April 1947 in New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada, aged 59.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Army Medical Corps.)  

Rank: Sergeant

Service Number: 523999

Date of Enlistment: 10 July 1916

Date of Discharge: 31 October 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: There are some records within his military documents which state that he deserted, though there is no evidence to say that he was found guilty.

Medals and Awards

James was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Robert Francis McHugh

Robert Francis McHugh

Personal Details

Born: 16 August 1889 in Bettisfield, Flintshire and baptised on 1 September 1889 at Hanmer Parish Church, Hanmer, Flintshire.

Family: He was the eldest of three children born to John McHugh, a publican and his wife Anne Elizabeth, nee Edwards. He appears to have married in Canada, though no actual records can be found for a marriage. The couple had a daughter, Bertha E, born in 1928. On the 1939 Register he is described as a widower. He married Ethel E West in 1940 in Gipping, Suffolk. No children can be found for this marriage.

Residence: In 1891 his family were living 34 Coleridge Street, West Derby, Lancashire. Ten years later his mother was a widow and the family were living at Tarts Hill, Bettisfield, Flintshire. In 1911 he was living at 25 Cross Street, Ellesmere, Shropshire. In 1914 he emigrated to Canada and appears to have settled in  the province of Saskatchewan. He returned to England in 1935 and in 1939 his address was Rectory Farm, Church Hill, Southwell, Nottinghamshire. At the time of his death in 1970 his home was 13 Bride Street, Needham Market, Suffolk.

Employment: In 1911 he was a baker. Whilst in Canada his occupation was a farmer. In 1939 he was an agricultural worker.

Died: 14 October 1970 in the Samford district of Suffolk, aged 80.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force  

Rank: Lance Corporal

Service Number: 84153

Date of Enlistment: 27 November 1915

Date of Discharge: 8 February 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: Whilst serving in France he was wounded on two separate occasions. The first time he received a gunshot wound to his shoulder and on the second occasion shrapnel wounds to his face and knee.

Medals and Awards

Robert was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Frederick Candlin Letheren

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 9 May 1896 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 31 May 1896 at the United Reformed Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the eldest of six children born to Frederick J Letheren, a tailor and his wife Nellie, nee Candlin. He married Ellen Winifred Chaney on 8 June 1920 in Guelph, Wellington, Ontario, Canada. The couple had three children.

Residence: At the time of his baptism in 1896 his family were living in Bridgewater Street, Whitchurch. In 1901 their address was Market Street, Oakengates, Shropshire. The family emigrated to Canada on 24 October 1907. In 1921 and now married he was living at 42 Bruce Street, Galt, Waterloo, Ontario. At the time of his death in 1946 he was living in Sudbury, Ontario.

Employment: On his Attestation documents he gave his occupation as a salesman. In 1921 he was an interior decorator.

Died: 23 April 1946 in Sudbury, Ontario, aged 49.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Field Artillery) 

Rank: Bombardier

Service Number: 84153

Date of Enlistment: 12 November 1914

Date of Discharge: 28 January 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: His brother, Colin Campbell Letheren, also served in the Canadian Field Artillery in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Frederick was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Herbert Conway Joyce

Herbert Conway Joyce

Personal Details

Born: 12 February 1887 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 6 August 1887 at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the second of five children born to Walter Conway Joyce, a clock manufacturer and his wife Edith Mary, nee Wilkinson. He married Elsie Mary Plumb on 9 December 1917 at St. Mark`s Church, Lewisham, London. The couple had five children, Mary Alice, Sydney Thomas, Dorothy Madge, Nora Winnifred and Leslie.

Residence: At the time of his baptism and in 1891 his family were living in High Street, Whitchurch. In 1901 his mother was now widowed and the family had moved to 17 Edgeley Road, Whitchurch. Herbert emigrated to Canada in 1905 and was living in Liscar, Manitoba in 1911. This was the address he gave when he enlisted in 1915. By 1921 and now married he was living in King Street, Verdin, Brandon, Manitoba. At the time of his death his home was 502 Stewart Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Employment: In 1911 he was a farmer and in 1921 he was a buttermaker.

Died: 9 August 1973 at Deer Lodge Hospital, Winnipeg, aged 86.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Lord Strathcona`s Horse) 

Rank: Sergeant

Service Number: 551029

Date of Enlistment: 20 August 1915

Date of Discharge: 9 February 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: Whilst serving in France he received a severe gunshot wound to his right thigh. His brother, Walter Dennis, also served in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Herbert was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Richard William Fowles

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 31 January 1891 in Whixall, Shropshire.

Family: He was the youngest of eight children born to John Fowles, a farmer and his wife Sarah, nee Batho. He married Edith Mary Skelton on 11 August 1919 in Kamloops, British Columbia. No children can be found for the marriage.

Residence: In 1891 his family were living at Higher Home Farm, Cumberland Lane, Whixall. Ten years later their address was Steele Heath, Prees, Shropshire. By 1911 he was a boarder at 12 Leasowe Avenue, Wallasey, Cheshire. He emigrated to Canada in 1913 and settled in Kamloops, British Columbia. In 1921 and now married, he was living at 1939 First Avenue East, Vancouver, British Columbia. At the time of his death in 1942 his home was 4990 Blenheim Street, Vancouver, British Columbia.

Employment: In 1911 he was a grocer. On his enlistment in 1915 his occupation was stated as a grocery clerk, however in 1921 he was a salesman.

Died: 5 May 1942 in Vancouver, British Columbia and buried at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Vancouver.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Army Medical Corps.) 

Rank: Sergeant

Service Number: 522785

Date of Enlistment: 3 September 1915

Date of Discharge: 8 July 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

Richard was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Arthur Samuel Evans

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 25 December 1886 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 26 January 1887 at St. Alkmunds Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the third of five children born to Samuel Evans, a stonemason and his wife Eliza, nee Adams. He married Doris Maltman on 6 April 1921 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. The couple had at least three children, Doris, Joan and Donald.

Residence: From the time of his baptism until at least 1901 his family were living in St. Mary`s Street, Whitchurch. His mother died in 1906 and he and his family emigrated to Canada in 1909. By 1911 they were living in the MacDonald Districts of Manitoba. On his enlistment in 1915 he gave his address as 330 Roseberry Street, St James, Winnipeg, Manitoba. Between 1921 and 1926 and now married, his family were living at 177 College Street, St James, Winnipeg. At the time of his death in 1982 his home was in New Westminster, British Columbia.

Employment: He was a grocer.

Died: 25 June 1982 in Westminster, British Columbia, aged 95.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force  

Rank: Acting Sergeant

Service Number: 829235

Date of Enlistment: 1 December 1915

Date of Discharge: 18 January 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: Whilst serving in France he suffered a gunshot wound to his thigh.

Medals and Awards

Arthur was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

William John Brown Bookey

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 8 May 1886 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the only child born to William John Brownrigg Bookey, a naval surgeon and his wife Ann Elizabeth, nee Brown. He married Alice Roberta Ogilvie on 9 October 1929 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The couple had two sons, William Robert and Thomas Patrick.

Residence: In 1901 he and his widowed mother were living in St. Mary`s Street, Whitchurch, Shropshire. At the time he was drafted into the Army in 1917 his address was 224 Shaw Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. When he died in 1979 his home was 120 Anne Street, Barrie, Ontario.

Employment: In 1917 he was a fitter of mechanical transport.

Died: 30 December 1979 at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Barrie, Simcoe County, Ontario, aged 93.

Other Information: In 1964 he was appointed as a serving brother of the Grand Priory in the British Realm of the Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem. In 1975 this was ‘upgraded’ to Officer (Brother).

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Engineer Training Dept.) 

Rank: Sapper

Service Number: 2008240

Date of Enlistment: 8 November 1917

Date of Discharge: 20 June 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation, medically unfit for general service.

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the Campaign medals (Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Richard Harry Madeley

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 12 November 1889 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: Parents not known. He married Lilian Jones on 1 April 1920 at St Michael and All Angels Church, Blackburn, Lancashire. The couple had a daughter, Elizabeth, born in 1921.

Residence: In 1891 and 1901 he was an inmate of the Union Workhouse, Whitchurch, Shropshire. When he enlisted in 1917 he was living at 836 Jubilee Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. On his discharge in 1919 he gave an address of 18 Ribble Street, Blackburn, Lancashire. In 1939 his home was Clayton Manor Lodge, Blackburn.

Employment: In 1917 he was a packer and in 1939 a chauffeur and gardener.

Died: In 1951 in Darwin, Lancashire, aged 61.

Other Information: It has proved difficult to trace this man from birth to death. The research has concluded that the Harry Madeley who was an inmate in the Whitchurch Union Workhouse was the Richard Henry Madeley who married Lilian Jones in 1920 and the Richard H Madeley who died in Darwin, Lancashire in 1951.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (1st Central Ontario Regiment) (previously Royal Flying Corps Canada)

Rank: Sapper

Service Number: 3040692 (previously Can 151228)

Date of Enlistment: Drafted into the Army on 4 September 1918 (previously enlisted in R.F.C. on 18 October 1917)

Date of Discharge: 17 June 1919 (previously discharged from R.F.C. on 2 September 1918)

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation (previously being no longer required upon annulment of transfer from R.F.C. to R.A.F.)

Medals and Awards

Harry was awarded the British War Medal

British War Medal


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal is a campaign medal of the United Kingdom which was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces for service in the First World War. Two versions of the medal were produced. About 6.5 million were struck in silver and 110,000 in bronze, the latter awarded to, among others, the Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps.


 

William Ewart Chidlow

William Ewart Chidlow

Personal Details

Born: 11 April 1887 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the eldest of four children born to John Chidlow, an insurance agent and his wife Jane, nee Bennett. His first wife died in 1912; he had one child, Eric Joseph, born from this marriage. He married Florence Sidwick in 1919 in Taunton, Somerset. The couple had three children, Florence, Marion Irene and John.

Residence:  In 1891 his family were living at 24 Green End, Whitchurch, Shropshire. By 1901 the family had moved to 49 Hyde Road, Denton, Lancashire. By 1910 he was living in Lloydminster, Alberta, Canada. In 1919 his address was 2221 Pine Street, Vancouver, British Columbia. In 1953 he and his family were living at 242 Bernard Avenue, Fraser Valley, Vancouver. At the time of his death in 1970 his home was in White Rock, Greater Vancouver.

Employment: In 1901 his occupation was a solicitor`s clerk.  Upon his Attestation in 1914 he stated that he was a law clerk. The Canadian residency records indicate he was a secretary.

Died: 4 May 1970 in White Rock, Greater Vancouver, aged 83.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Mounted Rifle Regiment)

Rank: Acting Colour Sergeant Major

Service Number: 114054

Date of Enlistment: 17 December 1914

Date of Discharge: 3 April 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: 18 March 1918, War Office Listed – “Mentioned for valuable services rendered in connection with the war.“

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the British War Medal

British War Medal


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal is a campaign medal of the United Kingdom which was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces for service in the First World War. Two versions of the medal were produced. About 6.5 million were struck in silver and 110,000 in bronze, the latter awarded to, among others, the Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps.


 

Albert Edward Baggaley

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 6 June 1895 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the only child born to Albert Baggaley, a groom and his wife Sarah Ann, nee Richards. He married Damaris Cudworth in 1919 in Newhaven, Sussex. The couple had seven children – Anne Dawn, Marcele Dorthea, Cecil Alfred, Ralph P, Keith Robert, Edward and Elizabeth Nora. Albert and Damaris divorced in 1951.

Residence: In 1901 and 1911 his family was living at 194 Wrexham Road, Whitchurch, Shropshire. He initially emigrated to Canada in 1912 and an address of Rossendale, Manitoba was given for him on his enlistment into the army in 1918. He  was discharged in England in 1919 when his home was given as 10 St. Mary`s Street, Whitchurch. He and his wife left Southampton for Canada on 1 June 1921, arriving in Quebec on 10 June. By 1926 his family were living in Brandon, Manitoba. At the time of his death in 1975 his home was in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Employment: In 1911 he was an errand boy and in 1918 a farm hand. When he emigrated in 1921 he stated that he was going to take a homestead.

Died: 18 January 1975 in Winnipeg, Manitoba aged 79.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force

Rank: Private

Service Number: 3347602

Date of Enlistment: 18 June 1918

Date of Discharge: 27 January 1919 in England

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

Not known

 

Charles Vincent Austin

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 1 December 1889 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 1 January 1890 at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the third of four children born to William Austin, a schoolmaster and his wife, Kate. He married Eileen Ethel Whitting on 12 December 1916 at St. Oswald`s Parish Church, Sheffield, Yorkshire. The couple had two children, Elliot Vincent and Terence Charles.

Residence: At the time of his baptism his family were living in Chester Road, Whitchurch, and were still there in 1891. By 1901 his father had died and the family had moved to 3 St. John`s Street, Whitchurch where his mother was the principal of a private school. There are addresses of 1154 Pacific Street, Vancouver, British Columbia and 275 Jarvis Street, Toronto,Ontario, Canada given for him on his Army medical records. The family returned to the UK in April 1927 and at the time of his death in 1927 his home was 50 Edgedale Road, Abbeydale, Sheffield, Yorkshire.

Employment: On his Attestation in 1916 his occupation was a clerk and bookkeeper; in 1927 it was a salesman.

Died: 27 November 1927 in Sheffield, Yorkshire, aged 37.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force

Rank: Corporal

Service Number: 524967

Date of Enlistment: 24 August 1916

Date of Discharge: 31 May 1917

Reason for Discharge: On medical grounds with nephritis

Medals and Awards

Charles was awarded the British War Medal

British War Medal


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal is a campaign medal of the United Kingdom which was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces for service in the First World War. Two versions of the medal were produced. About 6.5 million were struck in silver and 110,000 in bronze, the latter awarded to, among others, the Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps.


 

Harold Mark Anthony

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 9 March 1895 in Tilstock, Shropshire and baptised 19 May 1895 at Tilstock Parish Church, Tilstock.

Family: He was the youngest of four children born to Thomas James Anthony, a schoolmaster and his wife Harriet, nee Creswell. Harold also had eight half siblings. He married May Hughes on 9 June 1920 in Brantford, Brant, Ontario, Canada. No children can be found for the couple.

Residence: In 1901 he and his family were living in the School House, Tilstock, Shropshire. By 1911 he had moved with his widowed father to Tushingham, Cheshire. He emigrated to Canada in 1911, arriving on 4 May. In 1917 he was living in Branchton, Ontario. On his marriage in 1920 he gave an address of 23 Ainsley Street, Galt, Ontario but in 1921 he and his wife had moved to North Dumfries Township, Waterloo South, Ontario. An address of Felix Avenue, Windsor, Essex was given to him in 1957 on the Canada Voters List. At the time of his death in 1970 he was probably living in Windsor, Essex County, Ontario.

Employment: In 1911 he was a tailor`s assistant.  At the time of his marriage he stated that his occupation was a farmer. The 1921 census shows him as a labourer and the 1957 voter’s list shows him as a foreman.

Died: In 1970 and buried in Windsor, Essex County, aged 75

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force

Rank: Lance Corporal

Service Number: 3133902

Date of Enlistment: 11 May 1918

Date of Discharge: 19 June 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: His brother, Ernest Patterson Anthony, also served with the Canadian Expeditionary Force during WW1; another brother, Frederick Anderson Grant, also served as a Sergeant in the King`s Shropshire Light Infantry in WW1

Medals and Awards

Harold was awarded the British War Medal

British War Medal


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal is a campaign medal of the United Kingdom which was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces for service in the First World War. Two versions of the medal were produced. About 6.5 million were struck in silver and 110,000 in bronze, the latter awarded to, among others, the Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps.


 

Ernest Patterson Anthony

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 10 October 1888 (although his military details all state 1889) in Dilwyn, Herefordshire and baptised on 28 April 1889 at Tilstock Parish Church, Tilstock, Shropshire.

Family: He was the eldest of four children born to James Anthony, a school master and his wife Harriet, nee Cresswell. He had eight half brothers and sisters. He married Eula Stuart between September 1919 and January 1920 and had two step children, Robert and Maxine Stuart.

Residence: In 1891 and until at least 1901 his family were living in the School House, Tilstock, Shropshire. He emigrated to the United States in 1908 and at the time of his enlistment in 1917 his address was given as 401 West Market Street, Christopher, Illinois. In 1920 and now married, his family were living in Tyrone Township, Franklin, Illinois. Ten years later they were lodging at 6048 Harpar Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. In 1940 their home was still in Chicago.The address given for him at the time of his death in 1980 was 62884, Sesser, Franklin, Illinois.

Employment: In 1917 his occupation was given as a sales clerk and cook, in 1920 a salesman in a clothing store and in 1930 an assistant manager in a restaurant. By 1940 he was a cook in a restaurant.

Died: 20 December 1980 in Franklin Hospital, Benton, Franklin, Illinois, aged 92.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force

Rank: Acting Corporal

Service Number: 3031139

Date of Enlistment: 18 November 1917

Date of Discharge: 17 September 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: His brother, Harold Mark, also served with the Canadian Expeditionary Force during WW1; another brother, Frederick Anderson Grant, also served as a Sergeant in the King`s Shropshire Light Infantry in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Ernest was awarded the British War Medal

British War Medal


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal is a campaign medal of the United Kingdom which was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces for service in the First World War. Two versions of the medal were produced. About 6.5 million were struck in silver and 110,000 in bronze, the latter awarded to, among others, the Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps.


 

Canadian War Service Badge

Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Canadian War Badge was awarded to members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) who served in the United Kingdom or at the front, and who, due to old age, wounds or sickness, had retired or relinquished their commissions or been honourably discharged.

British War Medal

Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal is a campaign medal of the United Kingdom which was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces for service in the First World War. Two versions of the medal were produced. About 6.5 million were struck in silver and 110,000 in bronze, the latter awarded to, among others, the Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps.

William Crewe

Royal Army Ordnance Corps

Personal Details

Born: In 1875 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised 26 December 1875 at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church.

Family: He was one of seventeen children (only 8 of whom survived) born to William Crewe, a painter and his wife Margaret. He married Mary Gilbert on 12 July 1905 at St. Chad`s Church, Prees, Shropshire. The couple had four children, Edith May, Albert George, Martha Ellen and William Ernest.

Residence: In 1881 his family were living in St John`s Street, Whitchurch. By 1891 they had moved to 30 Newtown Street, Whitchurch and ten years later they had moved again to 38 Yardington, Whitchurch. In 1911 and now married, his home was 9 Barlow`s Yard, High Street, Whitchurch. On his enlistment in 1916 he gave an address of 41B Newtown, Whitchurch, however by 1917 that had changed to 34 Yardington, Whitchurch. This continued to be his home until his death in 1937.

Employment: He was a painter`s labourer in 1916.

Died: December 1937 in Whitchurch, and was buried on 3 January 1938 in Whitchurch Cemetery, aged 62.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Army Ordnance Corps.

Rank: Private

Service Number: 019782

Date of Enlistment: 4 July 1916

Date of Discharge: 7 August 1917

Reason for Discharge: Epilepsy

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal) and the Silver War Badge (number 120534)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Silver War Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.



 

Frederick Anderson Grant Anthony

King's Shropshire Light Infantry

Personal Details

Born: 11 April 1880 in Almeley, Herefordshire.

Family: He was one of nine children born to James Anthony, a school master and his wife Margaret, nee King. He also had four half siblings. He married Eleanor Burrows in 1906 in Whitchurch, Shropshire. The couple had two children, George Frank and Margaret H. Sadly Margaret died in the year in which she was born.

Residence: In 1881 his family were living in Short Heath, Willenhall, Wolverhampton, Staffordshire. By 1891 they had moved to the School House, Tilstock, Shropshire. This was still their home in 1901. By 1911 and now married with a son his family were living at 69 Talbot Street, Whitchurch. An address of 39 Talbot Street was given for him in 1918 when he was a prisoner of war. In 1939 he was living at Hazelwell, Queens Road, Whitchurch. At the time of his death in 1969 his home was 20A Claypit Street, Whitchurch.

Employment: In 1901 his occupation was a wheelwright. By 1911 he was a foreman in a timber yard and in 1939 the manager of the timber yard.

Died: 29 June 1969 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Military Details

Regiment: King’s Shropshire Light Infantry

Rank: Sergeant

Service Number: 201185

Date of Enlistment: Not known

Date of Discharge: Not known

Reason for Discharge: Not known

Medals and Awards

Frederick was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

John Evans

Alfred Edwards

Personal Details

Born in Whixall, Shropshire in 1889, the second of nine children born to John and Mary Evans of 9 Post Office Lane, Whixall. John married Sarah A Foster in 1915 in Whixall; no children can be traced for the marriage.

Regiment : 10th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers (previously Monmouthshire Regiment)
Rank : Private
Service Number : 54920 (previously 4493)

Killed in action; France 30 April 1917 Aged 28

Medals and Awards
John was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War Medal and Allied Victory Medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Alfred Edwards

Alfred Edwards

Personal Details

Born in 1883 in Tilstock, Shropshire, the second of seven children born to Alfred and Esther Edwards. He married Mary Ann in 1908 and together they had one child, Wilfred Thomas. In 1891 he was living in Tilstock with his family; by 1901 he was boarding at Willington Cross Farm, Willington, Hanmer, Flintshire. In 1911 and now married he lived at Holly Cottage, Hollinwood, Whixall, Shropshire.

Regiment : 10th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers (previously Monmouthshire Regiment)
Rank : Private
Service Number : 54923 (previously 4326)

Died of illness; France 4 February 1917 Aged 34

Medals and Awards
Alfred was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War Medal and Allied Victory Medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Alexander Milne Watson

King's Shropshire Light Infantry

Personal Details

Born: 10 January 1879 in Kirriemuir, Forfarshire, Scotland.

Family: He was the eldest of two children born to Alexander Milne Watson, a solicitor, and his wife Mary. He married Lilian Marion Weaver in 1906 and together they had three children – Thomas, Edmund and Lilian.

Residence: In 1881 he was living with his parents and siblings at Kirktonshae House, East Roods Street, Kirriemuir. In 1891 he was living with his sister and his maternal grandparents in Ash Wood Lane, Whitchurch, Shropshire; in the late 1890’s/early 1900’s he was serving with the Gordon Highlanders in the Boer War in South Africa. Having married in 1906, in 1911 his wife was living at 44 Mardol, Shrewsbury with their children and her widowed mother; Alexander was not with them. His RAF service record showed an address in 1918 of Myrtle House, Port Hill, Shrewsbury, Shropshire. In 1939 he was living with his family at 17 Grove Avenue, Vicars Cross, Cheshire; this was his address when he died in 1947.

Employment: He was a career soldier.

Died: 26 July 1947 in Vicars Cross, near Chester, Cheshire, aged 68.

Military Details

Regiment: King’s Shropshire Light Infantry, seconded to the Royal Air Force at the end of WW1

Rank: Captain

Service Number:

Date of Enlistment: Not known

Date of Discharge: Not known

Reason for Discharge: Not known

Medals and Awards

Alexander was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

John Humphreys

King's Shropshire Light Infantry

Personal Details

Born: In 1875 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 25 January the same year in St. Alkmund’s Parish Church, Whitchurch. He was also known as Jack Humphries.

Family: He was the fifth of ten children born to Thomas Humphreys, a tollgate keeper, and his wife Mary. John did not marry, but his military pension record indicates he had two illegitimate children whose guardian after he died was Miss M Leigh living at 84 Crown Street, City Road, Hulme, Manchester.

Residence: At the time of his baptism the family were living in Redbrook, near Whitchurch; by 1881 they had moved to Whitchurch Road, Hanmer, Flintshire, Wales where they were still living in 1891. In 1911 John lived at 71 Albert Road, Oswestry, Shropshire.

Employment: In 1891 and 1911 he was a railway porter. In 1901 he was serving with the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry in South Africa.

Died: 13 July 1920 in Chorlton, Lancashire.

Military Details

Regiment: King’s Shropshire Light Infantry 

Rank: Sergeant

Service Number: 14912

Date of Enlistment: 14 October 1914

Date of Discharge: 8 February 1916

Reason for Discharge: No longer physically fit for service

Other Information: John served in the Boer War (Private 3389 King’s Shropshire Light Infantry).

Medals and Awards

John was awarded the Silver War Badge (number 41939)

Silver War Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.



 

Joseph Lees

Labour Corps

Personal Details

Born: 27 July 1881 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and was baptised on 11 September the same year in Ightfield Parish Church, Shropshire.

Family: He was the second of four children born to Joseph Lees, a farmer, and his wife Mary Ann. Mary Ann died in 1890 and Joseph senior married Elizabeth Alice Garside in 1895 and together they had one child, a half sibling for Joseph junior. Joseph junior married Alice Edge on 14 January 1908 in Oldham and together they had eight children – Annie, Harold, Fred, Alice, Mary A, Wilfred (known as Bill) and twins Ellen (known as Nell or Nellie) and Albert.

Residence: At the time of his baptism the family were living in Ightfield; by 1891 they had moved to Ashton Road, Oldham, Lancashire. In 1901 Joseph was serving with the Manchester Regiment and living at their barracks in Aldershot, Hampshire. By 1911, and now married, Joseph was living in Brunswick Street, Oldham. His military discharge papers show an address of 65 Webster Street, Oldham which was still his address in 1939.

Employment: He was a general labourer.

Died: In 1975 in Oldham, aged 94.

Military Details

Regiment: Labour Corps (previously King’s Liverpool Regiment and Manchester Regiment)

Rank: Sergeant

Service Number: 487241 (previously 33572 and 2108)

Date of Enlistment: 19 July 1913

Date of Discharge: 10 February 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: Joseph had previously served with the Manchester Regiment between 1900 and 1912, including in the Boer War. During WW1 he served in France and Egypt, suffering a gunshot wound and deafness.

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the  Campaign Medals (1915 Star, British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Herbert Thornton

Cheshire Regiment

Personal Details

Born: 23 August 1878 in Broughall, Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the third of twelve children born to John Thornton, a farm labourer, and his wife Mary Jane. He married Mary Moores on 24 February 1904 in the Wesleyan Chapel, Whitchurch and together they had two children, Nellie and George Herbert. Sadly, Mary died in 1916; Herbert married Elizabeth Palin in 1918 in Whitchurch and together they had four children – Doris Elsie Palin, Mildred, Jack and Bob.

Residence: In 1881, he was living with his parents and siblings at Melverley, Whitchurch; by 1891 the family had moved to Green End, Whitchurch. Herbert was serving with the military in South Africa at the time of the 1901 Census. In 1911, having married, he was living with his wife and first child at 43 Tilstock, Shropshire. In 1939 he was living at 22 Tilstock where he continued to live until his death.

Employment: He enlisted in the military in 1898, serving through until his discharge in 1915, including a period in the Reserves. On his attestation in 1898 he stated his occupation as labourer. In 1911 he was a domestic gardener and in 1939 a general labourer.

Died: 17 April 1947 in Tilstock.

Military Details

Regiment: Cheshire Regiment

Rank: Private

Service Number: 5823

Date of Enlistment: 8 September 1898

Date of Discharge: 27 July 1915

Reason for Discharge: No longer physically fit for war service

Other Information: He suffered a gunshot wound to the spinal column which led to his discharge; no trace can be found of Herbert being awarded a Silver War badge. He served in South Africa in the Boer War.

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the  Campaign Medals (1914 Star, British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

James Major Ramsbottom Sutcliffe

Hampshire Regiment

Personal Details

Born: 26 June 1881 in Petersham, New South Wales, Australia and baptised on 17 July the same year in St. Peter’s Church, Cumberland, Sydney, Australia.

Family: He was one of six children born to Frank and Catherine Evelyn Sutcliffe. No marriage can be traced for James.

Residence: He was initially brought up in New South Wales, Australia. His parents returned to the UK sometime between 1887 and 1891, initially living at Wood Green, Church Minshull, Cheshire. They moved to Whitchurch, living at 172 Wrexham Road in 1901 and Bridge Cottage, Heath Lane, although James was not with them. We know that he served in the Boer War so was likely to be in South Africa. We know that in 1911 he returned to Southampton, travelling from Durban which suggests that he made his home in South Africa.

Employment: He was a farmer in 1914.

Died: In 1953 in Transvaal, Pretoria, South Africa.

Other Information: He was admitted to the Standerton Transvaal Freemason Lodge on 28 July 1914.

Military Details

Regiment: Hampshire Regiment, attached to the Shropshire Yeomanry

Rank: Lieutenant

Service Number:

Date of Enlistment: Not known

Date of Discharge: Not known

Reason for Discharge: Not known

Other Information: He served in the Boer War with the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry. His brother Charles Major Sutcliffe also served in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Not known

 

Croix de Guerre

The World War I Croix de guerre was established by royal decree on 25 October 1915 as an award for bravery or other military virtue on the battlefield. It was only awarded to individuals. The Croix de guerre was not only awarded for bravery but also for three years or more of service on the front line, or for good conduct on the battlefield. It was also awarded to volunteers older than 40 or younger than 16 after a minimum of 18 months of service, to escaped prisoners of war rejoining the armed forces, and to military personnel who were placed on inactive duty because of injury.

Click on the tag below to see details of each recipient.

Thomas Edwin Houghton

Royal Army Service Corps

Personal Details

Born: 24 January 1889 in Sandiway, Cheshire and baptised on 24 February the same year in Weaverham Parish Church, Cheshire.

Family: He was the second of four children born to Edwin Houghton, a stud groom, and his wife Emily. He married Julia M Allen in 1919 in Chester, Cheshire and together they had three children – Kenneth H, Peter H (who were twins) and Sylvia J.

Residence: At the time of his baptism, the family were living in Sandiway; by 1891 they had moved to School Road, Weaverham, Cheshire. In 1901 he was living with his family at Hill Farm, Ince, Chester, Cheshire and by 1911 they had moved to 30 Brook Lane, Chester. Thomas’s military papers indicate his address as Hinton Hall, Whitchurch, Shropshire. From at least 1939 to his death he lived with his wife and children at 11 Northway, Curzon Park, Chester.

Employment: In 1911 he was a chauffeur; in 1939 he was a garage proprietor.

Died: 7 May 1969 in Chester, aged 80.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Army Service Corps

Rank: Corporal

Service Number: M2/079537

Date of Enlistment: 24 April 1915

Date of Discharge: 9 June 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: His brother Edmund Mostyn Houghton also served in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Thomas was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal and Campaign Medals (1915 Star, British War medal and Victory medal)

Meritorious Service Medal


Meritorious Service Medal

The following Whitchurch men were recipients of the Meritorious Service Medal :

M2/167596 Private Alfred James Woolley, Royal Army Service Corps
Whitchurch, Shropshire – 14 May 1920

S4/144030 Corporal Thomas Barnett Cartwight, Army Service Corps
Whitchurch, Shropshire – 14 June 1918

Sapper J Harvey

Corporal T E Houghton

N.B. the date given is when the announcement appeared in the London Gazette



Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

George Gordon Shone

Royal Field Artillery

Personal Details

Born: 7 August 1886 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and was baptised on 1 September that year in St. Alkmund’s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the youngest of six children born to John Shone, a chemist and grocer, and his wife Mary.  His father died in 1889 and his mother married George Galloway in 1894. George married Eva Roller in 1915 in Maidenhead, Berkshire. By 1925 they had divorced. No children can be traced for the marriage.

Residence: From the time of his baptism until at least 1891 he lived with his family at 27 High Street, Whitchurch. He was living in Canada from 1903 to 1914 and 1923 to 1924. In the 1923 and 1925 electoral registers his address at which he was registered to vote was 67,68 Jermyn Street, London SW1 (his abode was shown as 3 Pall Mall Place, London SW1). He died in Florida, USA.

Employment: He was a mining engineer.

Died: 23 March 1929 in Miami, Florida, USA, aged 42.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Field Artillery

Rank: Major

Service Number:

Date of Enlistment: Not known

Date of Discharge: Not known

Reason for Discharge: Not known

Other Information: His brother Leighton Edward Shone also served in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Gordon was awarded the Military Cross and Campaign Medals (1915 Star, British War medal and Victory medal)

Military Cross


Military_Cross

The Military Cross is the third-level military decoration awarded to officers and (since 1993) other ranks of the British Armed Forces, and used to be awarded to officers of other Commonwealth countries.
The Military Cross is granted in recognition of "an act or acts of exemplary gallantry during active operations against the enemy on land to all members, of any rank in Our Armed Forces". In 1979, the Queen approved a proposal that a number of awards, including the Military Cross, could be awarded posthumously.

Click on the tag below to see details of each recipient.



Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Paul Humphrey Clarke

Royal Garrison Artillery

Personal Details

Born: 17 June 1891 in Godstone, Surrey and was baptised on 25 July the same year in Godstone Parish Church.

Family: He was the youngest of three children born to William Alexander Clarke, a solicitor, and his wife Sarah Helen Ann Deville. He married Joyce Chicheley Plowden in 1927 in Exeter, Devon and together they had three children – Barbara, Humphrey and Paul Ivor.

Residence: At the time of his baptism his parents residence was Calcutta, India; by 1901 they were living in New Woodhouses, Whitchurch, Shropshire and by 1911 at Broughall Cottage, Whitchurch. His father’s address of Ash Corner, Whitchurch was shown on his military papers. By March 1926 he had bought a farm in Kenya. His youngest son was born in Hartney Wintney, Hampshire in 1931. He settled in Kenya, living at Charity Farm, Nyeri at the time of his death.

Employment: After the war he was a farmer.

Died: 17 July 1946 at Nairobi, Kenya, aged 55.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Air Force Machine Gun School (previously Royal Garrison Artillery and East Africa Mounted Rifles)

Rank: Lieutenant (previously trooper in East Africa Rifles)

Service Number: 201 with East Africa Mounted Rifles

Date of Enlistment: 1914 or earlier

Date of Discharge: 24 February 1919 (discharged medically unfit from East Africa Mounted Rifles on 13 September 1915)

Reason for Discharge: Not known

Medals and Awards

Paul was awarded the Military Cross and Campaign Medals (1915 Star, British War medal and Victory medal)

Military Cross


Military_Cross

The Military Cross is the third-level military decoration awarded to officers and (since 1993) other ranks of the British Armed Forces, and used to be awarded to officers of other Commonwealth countries.
The Military Cross is granted in recognition of "an act or acts of exemplary gallantry during active operations against the enemy on land to all members, of any rank in Our Armed Forces". In 1979, the Queen approved a proposal that a number of awards, including the Military Cross, could be awarded posthumously.

Click on the tag below to see details of each recipient.



Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Joseph Coulthirst Frith

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 5 September 1884 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised 8 October 1884 at St Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the son of Henry Coulthirst Frith, a plumber and his wife Mary, nee Hayward. He married Jennie Marshall Robson on 7 September 1907 in London City, Middlesex, Ontario, Canada. The couple had six children, Robert, Florence, Jean, Isabella, Joseph and Abiel.

Residence: In 1891 his family were living at 71 Green End, Whitchurch, Shropshire. By 1901 he was a soldier based at the Royal Welsh Fusiliers Barracks, Wrexham, Denbighshire. He emigrated to Canada in 1903. In 1911 and now married, his home was at 375 Glebes Street, London City, Ontario. At the time of his Attestation in 1914 the family had moved to 10 Argyle Street, London, Ontario. By 1927 his home was 34 Oxford Street, London, Ontario.

Employment: When he enlisted in 1914 he was a tailor`s fitter, however at the time of his death he was a dental mechanic.

Died: 7 May 1927 at the Victoria Hospital, London, Ontario, aged 42.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Canadian Regiment, Canadian Expeditionary Force

Rank:  Lieutenant

Service Number: 12937, 53072

Date of Enlistment: 23 November 1914

Date of Discharge: 31 August 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: He spent 7 years in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, serving in South Africa during the Second Boer War, before emigrating to Canada. 

In 1916 he suffered a severe gunshot wound to his upper jaw and neck which resulted in him having difficulty chewing and swallowing his food.

Medals and Awards

Joseph was awarded the Military Medal, the Croix de Guerre, the Royal Humane Society Medal and Campaign Medals (1915 Star, British War medal and Victory medal)

Military Medal

Croix de Guerre


The World War I Croix de guerre was established by royal decree on 25 October 1915 as an award for bravery or other military virtue on the battlefield. It was only awarded to individuals. The Croix de guerre was not only awarded for bravery but also for three years or more of service on the front line, or for good conduct on the battlefield. It was also awarded to volunteers older than 40 or younger than 16 after a minimum of 18 months of service, to escaped prisoners of war rejoining the armed forces, and to military personnel who were placed on inactive duty because of injury.

Click on the tag below to see details of each recipient.


Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

William Charles Beckett

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 17 December 1882 in Brunel, Muskoka, Ontario, Canada.

Family: He was the third of four children born to Henry Percival and Rosa Helen Beckett. He married Madge Farrington in Whitchurch, Shropshire in 1906; no children can be traced for the marriage.

Education: He was admitted into Whitchurch Boys Grammar School on 23 December 1890.

Residence: William returned from Canada with his widowed mother and siblings and lived at 7 Brownlow Street, Whitchurch in 1891. In 1911 William and Madge were boarding in Park View, Kettering, Northamptonshire. When he enlisted in 1915 his wife’s address was shown as 1377 Van Horne Avenue, Montreal, Canada, but his military papers showed his mother’s address of The Bungalow, Whitchurch. In August 1915 Madge returned to the UK and lived with her family in Bolton, Lancashire. In 1939 they were living at 52 Newtown Street, Wellingborough, Northamptonshire.

Employment: In 1911 and 1939 he was a leather salesman. His attestation papers in 1915 showed him as a storekeeper.

Died: In 1942 in Wellingborough.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force (attached to the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry)

Rank: Private (Lieutenant when commissioned into Imperial Army)

Service Number: 65060 (Canadian Forces)

Date of Enlistment: 25 January 1915

Date of Discharge: 4 September 1916 (date of discharge from KSLI not known)

Reason for Discharge: To take up a commission in the Imperial Army

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the Military Cross and Campaign Medals (1915 Star, British War medal and Victory medal)

Military Cross


Military_Cross

The Military Cross is the third-level military decoration awarded to officers and (since 1993) other ranks of the British Armed Forces, and used to be awarded to officers of other Commonwealth countries.
The Military Cross is granted in recognition of "an act or acts of exemplary gallantry during active operations against the enemy on land to all members, of any rank in Our Armed Forces". In 1979, the Queen approved a proposal that a number of awards, including the Military Cross, could be awarded posthumously.

Click on the tag below to see details of each recipient.



Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Wilfred Madeley

King's Shropshire Light Infantry

Personal Details

Born: 16 April 1889 in Grindley Brook, Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 22 May the same year in St. Alkmund’s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the fifth of ten children born to Henry Madeley, a labourer and his wife Mary Elizabeth. He married Elizabeth A Elsley in 1920 in Whitchurch and together they had three children – Phyllis J, Florence N and Thomas H.

Residence: He lived in Grindley Brook at the time of his baptism, in 1901 and 1939. In 1919 his address was Bradley Bank, Malpas, Cheshire; at the time of his death he was living at 23 Yardington, Whitchurch.

Employment: In 1907 and 1909 he was a labourer working for the London and North Western Railway. In 1939 he was an agricultural labourer.

Died: 20 November 1961 at Deermoss Hospital, Whitchurch, aged 72, and was buried on 27 November the same year in Whitchurch cemetery.

Military Details

Regiment: King’s Shropshire Light Infantry (previously Shropshire Yeomanry)

Rank: Sergeant

Service Number: 26586

Date of Enlistment: 26 September 1914

Date of Discharge: 17 April 1919

Reason for Discharge: Surplus to military requirements

Medals and Awards

Wilfred was awarded the Military Medal, Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal) and Silver War Badge (number 504570)

Military Medal

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Silver War Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.



 

William Vincent Birchall

King's Shropshire Light Infantry

Personal Details

Born: 17 January 1896 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the only child of William Caleb Birchall, an ironmonger, and his wife Mary Ellen, nee Pickford. He married Annie Boutflour Dickman (known as Nancy) in 1922 in Morpeth, Northumberland and together they had two children Kenneth F (who sadly died at the age of two) and Philip R.

Residence: In 1901 he was living with his parents at 23 St. John’s Street, Whitchurch; by 1911 they had moved to 10 Richmond Terrace, Station Road, Whitchurch. In 1939 he was living with his wife and child at Roddam House, Alport Road, Whitchurch and at the time of his death he lived at 28 Highfields Avenue, Whitchurch.

Education: He attended Whitchurch Grammar School between 21 January 1905 and 22 December 1909. He left to attend St. Oswald’s College, Ellesmere, Shropshire.

Employment: In 1911 he was assisting in his father’s ironmongery business in High Street, Whitchurch. His father took him into partnership in 1925 and he remained running the business until it closed in 1971. His father retired in 1953.

Died: 2 April 1983 at the Cottage Hospital, Whitchurch, aged 87, and his ashes were interred in Whitchurch cemetery on 10 April the same year.

Other Information: William (or Vincent as he was known) was President of Whitchurch Rotary club 1952/53 and was a long term rotarian.

Military Details

Regiment: King’s Shropshire Light Infantry (previously Shropshire Yeomanry)

Rank: Private

Service Number: 26600 (previously 2114)

Date of Enlistment: Not known

Date of Discharge: Not known

Reason for Discharge: Not known

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the Military Medal and Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Military Medal

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

George Grindley

Royal Welsh Fusiliers

Personal Details

Born: In 1894 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and was baptised on 7 October the same year in St. Alkmund’s Parish Church.

Family: He was the second of three children born to George Grindley, a railway shunter, and his wife Ellen. No marriage can be traced for George junior.

Residence: At the time of his baptism the family were living in West End, Whitchurch; in 1901 and 1911 he was living with his parents and siblings at 58 Oddfellows Cottages, Whitchurch. His address at the time of his death was 58 West End, Whitchurch (these three dwellings are likely to be the same).

Employment: In 1911 he was a newsboy.

Died: 5 February 1923, killed in action whilst serving with the Royal Welsh Fusiliers at Tauda China, Waziristan, India.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Welsh Fusiliers

Rank: Company Sergeant Major

Service Number: 37791

Date of Enlistment: Not known

Date of Discharge: Not known

Reason for Discharge: Not known

Other Information: George re-enlisted in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers (number 4179610) on 11 March 1919, going on to lose his life in action in Waziristan, India. He is commemorated on the Royal Welsh Fusiliers Waziristan War Memorial inside St. Giles’ Parish Church, Wrexham, Denbighshire, Wales.

Medals and Awards

George was awarded the Military Medal (London Gazette 14 May 1919) and the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Military Medal

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Harry Beddows

Royal Welsh Fusiliers

Personal Details

Born: Henry Beddows on 1 February 1890 in Tilstock, Shropshire. His family changed their name from Beddow to Beddows between 1901 and 1911.

Family: He was the ninth of twelve children born to Thomas Beddow, a railway labourer and his wife Christina. He married Kathleen Annie Brookes (nee Ankers) in 1920 in Chester, Cheshire and together they had three children – Martha F and twins Eric and Harry.

Residence: In 1891 he was living with his family in Steele Road, Whitchurch, Shropshire; by 1901 they had moved to Tilstock Village where they continued to live in 1911. In 1939 he was living at 17 Hollins Lane, Wem, Shropshire.

Employment: In 1911 he was a farm labourer; in 1939 he was a skilled bricklayer.

Died: In 1963 in Whitchurch, aged 73.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Welsh Fusiliers

Rank: Private

Service Number: 17573

Date of Enlistment: Not known

Date of Discharge: 13 March 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: His brother Thomas also served in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Harry was awarded the Military Medal (London Gazette 23 July 1919) and the Campaign Medals (1915 Star, British War medal and Victory medal)

Military Medal

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

George Robert Jones

Royal Engineers

Personal Details

Born: 26 May 1883 in Lilleshall, Shropshire and was baptised on 24 June the same year in Lilleshall Parish Church.

Family: He was the oldest of three children born to George Jones, a gardener, and his wife Eliza. He married Caroline Anne Rees on 1 May 1909 in Builth, Breconshire, Wales and was father to Lilian and Josephine.

Residence: At the time of his baptism the family was living in Lilleshall. In 1891 the family was living at 17 Lutton View, Meole Brace, Shrewsbury, Shropshire. In 1901 they were living at 87 Tedsmore Bank, West Felton, Oswestry, Shropshire. In 1911 he was living at Hanmer, near Whitchurch, Shropshire and in 1916 he was living at 39 Worthington Street, Whitchurch. At the time of his death he was living at 1 Hollymount, Shavington, near Crewe, Cheshire.

Employment: In 1901 he was a grocer’s porter; in 1911 he was a domestic footman. When he enlisted he indicated his occupation as chauffeur and in 1939 he was a motor driver.

Died: 31 July 1958 at the Promenade Hospital, Southport, Lancashire, aged 72.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Engineers

Rank: Driver

Service Number: 194893

Date of Enlistment: 10 May 1916

Date of Discharge: 22 February 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

George was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

William Edward Judson

Tank Corps

Personal Details

Born: 19 January 1886 in Tilstock, Shropshire and baptised on 21 February 1886 in Tilstock Parish Church.

Family: He was the third of five children born to Edward Judson, a railway porter, and his wife Ann. He married Gladys Dyer in 1916 and was father to Eileen.

Residence: In 1886 and 1891 the family was living at Diglake, Tilstock, Whitchurch, Shropshire. By 1901 he had left school and was living at Steele Heath, Prees, Shropshire. In 1911 he was living back with his family at 6 Egerton Road, Whitchurch, but by 1915 they had moved to 1 Catteralls Lane, Whitchurch. At the time of his demobilization his address was recorded as 6 Walls Bank, Wall, Church Stretton, Shropshire.

Employment: In 1901 he was working as a domestic groom, but by 1911 he was employed as labourer at an Iron Foundry.

Died: In 1960 in Whitchurch, aged 74.

Military Details

Regiment: Tank Corps (previously Machine Gun Corps and Yorkshire Regiment)

Rank: Private

Service Number: 95208 (previously 6679)

Date of Enlistment: 30 November 1915

Date of Discharge: 5 December 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: In some military records his second name is listed as George. He could not be found in the 1939 Register although his wife, Gladys, was living with her mother at 4 Council Houses, Wem, Shropshire.

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Frederick Moffatt Johnson

Machine Gun Corps

Personal Details

Born: 15 April 1880 in Hanley, Stoke-upon-Trent, Staffordshire and baptised on 19 March 1895 in the Parish Church of Northwood, Hanley.

Family: He was the second of three children born to William Thomas Johnson, a potter’s manager, and his wife Jane. No marriage can be traced for Frederick.

Residence: In 1891 he was living with his parents and siblings at 83 Mount Street, Stoke-upon-Trent; by 1901 they had moved to 9 Jervis Street, Hanley. At the time he enlisted he was living at Hadley Farm, Wrexham Road, Whitchurch. At the time of his death he was living at 95 Brook Street, Hanley.

Employment: In 1901 he was a groom; at the time he enlisted he was a farm assistant.

Died: In 1922 in Stoke-upon-Trent, aged 42.

Military Details

Regiment: Machine Gun Corps (previously Cheshire Regiment)

Rank: Private

Service Number: 28194 (previously 30588 and 50457)

Date of Enlistment: 30 November 1915

Date of Discharge: 8 May 1918

Reason for Discharge: No longer physically fit for war service

Other Information: He suffered a gunshot wound to the ankle.

Medals and Awards

Frederick was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal) and the Silver War Badge (number 363762) awarded 21 May 1918

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Silver War Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.



 

William John Hughes

Royal Garrison Artillery

Personal Details

Born: 14 April 1879 in Tarporley, Cheshire.

Family: He was the fourth of eight children born to Robert Hughes, a joiner, and his wife Catherine. He married Mabel Catherine Roberts on 27 January 1912 in Bangor, Caernarvonshire, Wales and was father to Henry, William, Alice and Evelyn.

Residence: In 1881 the family lived at Riddal Heath, Tarporley, Cheshire and in 1891 they lived at Havelock Street, Monks Coppenhall, Nantwich, Cheshire. In 1901 he was living at Garden Bothy, Llandwrog, Carnarvon, Caernarvonshire and in 1911 was at Ripley Leeds, Ripley, West Riding. In 1915 he was living at Edgeley Bank, Whitchurch, Shropshire. In 1939 he lived at Hall Lodge Pickhill, Wrexham, Denbighshire, Wales.

Employment: He was a gardener until at least 1939.

Died: In 1973 in Wrexham, Denbighshire, Wales, aged 94.

Other Information: During the war his family was living at Bala Cottage, Llandegai, Bangor.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Garrison Artillery

Rank: Gunner

Service Number: 301987

Date of Enlistment: 10 December 1915

Date of Discharge: 24 April 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Frank Jones

Royal Engineers

Personal Details

Born: 5 November 1882 in Waverton, Cheshire and baptised on 10 December the same year in the Parish Church of Waverton.

Family: He was the third of seven children born to William Jones, an agricultural labourer, and his wife Eliza. He married Sarah Alice Hayman on 27 December 1909 in Saltney Parish Church, Cheshire and together they had three children – Arthur Robert, Frances May and Frank Hayman.

Residence: From the time of his baptism until at least 1901 he was living in Waverton with his parents and siblings. In 1911, and now married, he lived at 9 Brook Lane, Vicars Cross, Great Barrow, Chester, Cheshire. From at least 1915 to 1918 he was living at 10 Worthington Street, Whitchurch, Shropshire and in 1939 he lived at 11 Hillfield Place, Nantwich, Cheshire.

Employment: In 1901 he was a carter on a farm; from 1911 to at least 1939 he was a Post Office engineering lineman.

Died: Possibly in 1954 in Crewe, Cheshire, aged 72.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Engineers

Rank: Private

Service Number: 373075

Date of Enlistment: 10 December 1915

Date of Discharge: 14 December 1918

Reason for Discharge: Surplus to military requirements

Medals and Awards

None identified

 

William Ben Robinson

Royal Engineers

Personal Details

Born: 23 April 1883 in Shrewsbury, Shropshire.

Family: He was the fourth child born to William Robinson, a post office clerk and his wife Emily Jane, nee Lloyd. He married Dora Davies on 3 June 1909 at St John`s Methodist Church, Whitchurch, Shropshire. The couple had a daughter, Joan, born in 1917.

Residence: In 1891 his family were living at 37 Albert Street, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, however by 1901 they had moved to 15 Wyle Cop, Shrewsbury. In 1911 and now married, his address was 207 Station Road, Kings Heath, Worcestershire. At the time of his enlistment in 1915 he was living at 40 Phipson Road, Sparkbrook, Birmingham. The 1939 Register showed an address of 10 Hollywood Lane, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire. This continued to his home until his death in 1959.

Employment: In 1911 he was described as a sorting clerk and telegraphist working for the G.P.O. This was still his occupation in 1915. By 1939 he was an Assistant Superintendent in the postal division of the G.P.O. in Birmingham.

Died: 17 January 1959 in Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, aged 75.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Engineers

Rank: Sapper

Service Number: 194931

Date of Enlistment: 11 October 1915

Date of Discharge: 12 October 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

William Price Jones

Labour Corps

Personal Details

Born: 3 May 1893 in Richard’s Castle, Herefordshire and baptised on 8 August 1893 in the Wesleyan Methodist Church, Ludlow, Shropshire.

Family: He was the younger of two children born to William Jones, a blacksmith, and his wife Sarah. He married Beatrice Farmer on 3 March 1915 at the Wesleyan Methodist Church, Ludlow and was father to William, Sarah, Gertrude, Percy, Victor, Alan, Leslie and Cecil.

Residence: In 1901 the family was living at The Poplars, Richard’s Castle, Ludlow. In 1911 he was living at the Blacksmiths Shop, Richards Castle. At the time of enlistment he was living at 25 Egerton Road, Whitchurch, Shropshire but subsequently moved to the Police Station, Cheswardine, Market Drayton, Shropshire. In 1939 he was living at Mitnal Farm, Ludlow where he continued to live until his death.

Employment: In 1911 he was a waggoner on a farm and by 1915 he was a Police Constable. In 1939 he was a dairy farmer.

Died: 20 December 1947 in Richard’s Castle, aged 53.

Military Details

Regiment: Labour Corps (Agricultural Coy.) (previously Royal Garrison Artillery)

Rank: Private

Service Number: 494870

Date of Enlistment: 10 December 1915

Date of Discharge: 12 February 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: Although he enlisted in 1915 he was not called up until 30 June 1917.

Medals and Awards

Not known

 

Sydney Lloyd Jones

Royal Engineers

Personal Details

Born: 16 February 1895 in Llanrhaeadr, Denbighshire, Wales.

Family: He was the grandson of Margaret Jones, an innkeeper and probably the son of Joseph Jones, a car proprietor and his wife Mary Ann. He married Annie Lewis in 1924 in Whitchurch, Shropshire. The couple had two children, Richard L and Ann L.

Residence: In 1901 he was living with his grandmother at the Sun Inn, Waterfall Street, Llanrhaeadr, Denbighshire. By 1911 he and his grandmother`s address was Liverpool House, Llanrhaeadr. At the time of his enlistment in 1915 he was living at 147 Alkington Road, Whitchurch. In 1939 he and his family were living at 50 Wrexham Road, Whitchurch. This continued to be his home until his death in 1958.

Employment: In 1915 he was a G.P.O. telegraphist and in 1939 a post office clerk.

Died: 21 September 1958 in Whitchurch, aged 63.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Engineers

Rank: Sapper

Service Number: 151919

Date of Enlistment: 9 December 1915

Date of Discharge: 23 April 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

Sydney was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

James Henry Foster

King's Shropshire Light Infantry

Personal Details

Born: 8 August 1897 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the fourth of five children born to Alfred Foster, a farm labourer, and his wife Elizabeth Ellen. He married Dorothy M Preece in 1925 in Whitchurch and together they had five children – Corbet J, Frederick J, Dorothea E, Henry O and Geoffrey E.

Residence: In 1901 he was living at Broughall Lodge, Broughall, Whitchurch and in 1911 the family resided at Broughall House Lodge, Broughall. The births of all five children were registered in Atcham, Shropshire, so it is likely he was living there between 1925 and 1933. In 1939 he was living at 25 St. John’s Street, Whitchurch; his children were living in Atcham with their maternal grandparents.

Employment: In 1914 he was a farm labourer working at Chinnel Farm, Whitchurch. In 1939 he was a steel erector.

Died: In 1973 in Oswestry, Shropshire.

Military Details

Regiment: King’s Shropshire Light Infantry

Rank: Private

Service Number: 200945 (previously 2770)

Date of Enlistment: 4 November 1914

Date of Discharge: 19 March 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: He was wounded and taken prisoner of war at Cambrai by the Germans on 30 December 1917 and interned in the Schulter Munster POW camp. He was released on 8 December 1918. He was entitled to wear a wound stripe.

Medals and Awards

James was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Samuel Piggott

South Lancashire Regiment

Personal Details

Born: 12 May 1881 in Tushingham, Cheshire.

Family: He was the second of four children born to George Piggott, a railway platelayer and his wife Sarah. No marriage can be found for him.

Residence: In 1891 his family were living at Ash Lane, Ash, Shropshire. By 1901 the family had moved to 34 Chester Road, Whitchurch, Shropshire. The 1911 Census recorded his address as 21 Stanley Road, Ellesmere Port, Cheshire, but at the time of his enlistment in 1915 his home was stated as 29 Merseyton Road, Ellesmere Port. This continued to be his address until at least 1939.

Employment:  In 1891 he was a general labourer. By 1911 and now living in Ellesmere Port he was a dock labourer, however his occupation had changed again in 1915 when he was recorded as being a railway porter. On the 1939 Register he was described as a general labourer.

Died: In 1980 at the Royal Shrewsbury Hospital Shropshire, aged 81, and buried in Whitchurch Cemetery on 14 May 1980.

Military Details

Regiment: South Lancashire Regiment

Rank: Private

Service Number: TR3/87 (previously 19107)

Date of Enlistment: 10 December 1915

Date of Discharge: 22 June 1916

Reason for Discharge: Not likely to become an efficient soldier

Medals and Awards

None found (unlikely to have seen overseas service)

 

John Abel Purcell

Training Reserve Corps

Personal Details

Born: 1 July 1898 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the second child born to George Purcell, a railway platelayer and his wife Mary Ellen, nee Williams. No marriage can be found for him.

Residence: In 1901 his family were living at Foxes Lane, Broughall, Whitchurch. On the 1911 Census he and his mother were staying with his grandfather, George Williams, at Iscoyd Green, Iscoyd, Flintshire. On his enlistment in 1915 he gave his address as Foxes Lane, Broughall. This was still his address in 1939. At the time of his death in 1980 his home was 17 Talbot Street, Whitchurch.

Education: He attended Ash School, Shropshire between 23 January 1911 and 2 June 1912

Employment: In 1915 he was an agricultural labourer and in 1939 a builder`s labourer.

Died: In 1980 at the Royal Shrewsbury Hospital Shropshire, aged 81, and buried in Whitchurch Cemetery on 14 May 1980.

Military Details

Regiment: Training Reserve Corps (previously King`s Shropshire Light Infantry)

Rank: Private

Service Number: TR3/87 (previously 19107)

Date of Enlistment: 30 October 1915

Date of Discharge: 8 November 1916

Reason for Discharge: No longer physically fit for war service

Medals and Awards

John was awarded the Silver War Badge (number 114106) on 29 January 1917

Silver War Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.



 

Walter Price

Grenadier Guards

Personal Details

Born: 18 May 1897 in Ellesmere, Shropshire.

Family: He was the second of at least four children born to Edward Price, a coachman and his wife Mary Jane, nee Humphries. He married Mary E Cutler in 1929 in Whitchurch, Shropshire. The couple had two children, Mary and George E.

Residence: In 1901 he and his family were living at Perthy, Frankton, Shropshire. By 1911 the family had moved to Wicksted Cottage, Wicksted Hall, Wirswall, Whitchurch. An address of 12 Catteralls Lane, Whitchurch was given for him on his Attestation in 1915. In 1939 and now married, he was living at 38 Wayland Road, Whitchurch. This continued to be his home until his death in 1971.

Education: He was admitted to Marbury School, Cheshire on 26 August 1907.

Employment: In 1915 he was a railway porter. By 1939 he was a shunter working for the LM&S Railway Company.

Died: In 1971 in Whitchurch Cottage Hospital and buried at Whitchurch Cemetery on 2 July 1971, aged 74.

Military Details

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

Rank: Private

Service Number: 29587

Date of Enlistment: 19 November 1915

Date of Discharge: 17 October 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

Walter was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

John Passant

Monmouthshire Regiment

Personal Details

Born: 26 December 1886 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised 26 January 1887 at St Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch. His name was registered on birth as John Passant Jones.

Family: He was the eldest child born to John Passant, a shoemaker and his wife Annie (nee Jones). He married Florence Bateman on 21 December 1908 at St Michael`s Parish Church, Marbury, Cheshire. Together they had seven children, Vera, John, Lillian, Richard, Florence, Harold and Kenneth. Sadly John died in 1911, aged three months.

Residence: At the time of his baptism and in 1891 his family were living in Sherrymill Hill, Whitchurch, Shropshire. By 1911 and now married with a child, his home was 9 Station Road, Whitchurch. This was still his address when he enlisted in the Army in 1915. In 1922 he was living at 4 Wood Street, Hyde, Cheshire and by 1939 he and his family had moved to 42 Woodfield Avenue, Hyde. At the time of his death in 1966 his home was 19 Springwood Close, Romiley, Cheshire.

Employment: He was a postman.

Died: In 1966 in the North East Registration District of Cheshire.

Military Details

Regiment: Monmouthshire Regiment

Rank: Private

Service Number: 227764 (previously 15031 and 4409)

Date of Enlistment: 4 December 1915

Date of Discharge: 2 March 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

John was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Thomas William Percy Jenks

Royal Field Artillery

Personal Details

Born: 26 February 1892 in Grinshill, near Wem, Shropshire and baptised 3 April 1892 in Grinshill Parish Church. He was known as Percy.

Family: He was the second of five children born to Edwin Jenks, a stone sawyer and his wife Emma. He married Alice Savage in 1915 in Bucklow, Cheshire. The couple had a daughter, Dorothy A, born in 1921 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Residence: At the time of his baptism in 1892, he and his family were living in Grinshill. By 1901 they had moved to Albert Place, Mill Fields, Wellington, Shropshire. In 1911 the address given for him and his family on the census was 19 Egerton Road, Whitchurch, Shropshire.  When he enlisted in 1915 his address was 4 Pepper Street, Whitchurch. In 1919 and now married, he and his wife were living at 57 Egerton Road, Whitchurch. This continued to be his home until his death in 1924.

Employment: In 1911 his occupation was a butcher`s apprentice. He gave this as his job on his enlistment in 1915, however in 1915 he also seemed to have worked for several months as a labourer for the London and North Western Railway Company.

Died: 2 December 1924 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Field Artillery (previously Shropshire Yeomanry)

Rank: Gunner

Service Number: 105506 (previously 1983)

Date of Enlistment: 29 September 1914

Date of Discharge: 16 February 1919  (previously 19 February 1915)

Reason for Discharge: Not known (previously discharged in 1915 as permanently unfit)

Other Information: His brother, Edwin Charles Jenks, also served in WW1. Percy was discharged as medically unfit in 1915 but re-enlisted in a different regiment.

Medals and Awards

Percy was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Ben Holbrook

Labour Corps

Personal Details

Born: In 1873 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the fourth of five children born to Benjamin Holbrook, a bricklayer and his wife Ann. The 1911 Census records Ben and Elizabeth Clarke having six children, Doris, Robert, Annie, Edward, James and Alfred. However Doris and Robert are probably from Elizabeth`s marriage to Robert Clarke (who died in 1901). Another child, Benjamin was born to the couple in 1914, according to military records.

Residence: On the 1881 and 1891 Census, he was living at 20 Newtown Street, Whitchurch. In 1911 his address was 96 Moor Street, Blackburn, Lancashire. On his military documents an address of 16 Smithies Street, Blackburn was given for him.

Employment: In 1891, 1911 and 1914 he was a labourer.

Died: 1926 in Blackburn, Lancashire.

Military Details

Regiment: Labour Corps (previously King`s Shropshire Light Infantry)

Rank: Private

Service Number: 474391 (previously 7712)

Date of Enlistment: 12 October 1914

Date of Discharge: 9 April 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: Prior to WW1 he had served in the King`s Shropshire Light Infantry (3585) from 31 December 1891 to 30 December 1903 (including in the Boer War). After WW1 he re-enlisted and served from 2 August 1919 to 23 January 1920 in the Norfolk Regiment (73375). His brother James also served in WW 1.

Medals and Awards

Ben was awarded the Campaign Medals (1915 Star, British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Herbert William Harper

Gold Coast Regiment

Personal Details

Born:In 1894 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the third of six children born to George Harper, a blacksmith and his wife Ann. He married Constance M. Pace in 1919 in Whitchurch. No children can be found for the couple.

Residence: In 1901 he and his family were living at 24 Egerton Road, Whitchurch, Shropshire. By 1911 they had moved to 1 Braeside, Edgeley Road, Whitchurch. This was the address given for him on his military documents.

Employment: He was a carpenter and joiner.

Died: In 1925 in Chester, Cheshire, aged 30.

Military Details

Regiment: Gold Coast Regiment (previously King`s Shropshire Light Infantry) 

Rank: Acting Sergeant

Service Number: 200947 (previously 2773)

Date of Enlistment: 3 November 1914

Date of Discharge: 8 June 1919

Reason for Discharge: Disembodied, surplus to military requirements having suffered an impairment since entry to service

Other Information: Two of Herbert`s brothers, George and Frederick, also served in World War 1. Frederick was killed in action in France on 14 July 1916.

Medals and Awards

Herbert was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal) and the Silver War Badge (number 474099) issued 22 January 1920.

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Silver War Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.



 

Trevor Hancock

Royal Irish Regiment

Personal Details

Born: 23 May 1894 in Burleydam, Cheshire and baptised with his twin sister on 1 July 1894 at St Michael`s Parish Church, Burleydam.

Family: He was the third of five children born to Thomas Allen Hancock, a farm labourer and his wife Sarah. He married Sarah Jane Griffiths in 1927 in Chester, Cheshire. They had one child, Alan W.

Residence: From the time of his baptism in 1894 until at least 1901 his family were living at 2 Park Cottages, Dodds Green, Cheshire. By 1911 he was a boarder at Thornley Longridge, Chipping, Preston, Lancashire. He gave an address of Combermere Cottage, Burleydam on his enlistment in 1915, this was still his address in 1919. During this time he listed another address: 26 Victoria Road, Gorton, Manchester. By 1939 and married his home was Stone Lodge, Combermere, Burleydam, Cheshire.

Employment: In 1911 he was a groom and in 1915 a labourer. By 1939 his occupation was a gardener.

Died:In 1977 in North Shropshire, aged 82.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Irish Regiment  (previously Suffolk Regiment, Cheshire Regiment and King`s Shropshire Light Infantry) 

Rank: Private

Service Number: 3798 (previously 49457, 65433 and 23154)

Date of Enlistment: 7 December 1915

Date of Discharge: 29 September 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

Trevor was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

John Henry Foster

Welsh Regiment

Personal Details

Born: 8 September 1896 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised 16 August 1897 at the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the third of four children born to Thomas Foster, an agricultural labourer and his wife Martha. He married Frances Martha Dodd in 1917 in Whitchurch, Shropshire. The couple had five children, John Thomas, Frances Mary, Elsie M, Stanley H and Harry. Sadly Harry died before reaching his first birthday.

Residence: At the time of his baptism in 1897 his family were living at Hollyhurst, near Whitchurch. By 1901 their address was Black Park, Whitchurch. In 1911 the family had moved to 18 Grindley Brook, Whitchurch. On his Attestation in 1915 he gave his address as Alkington Grange, Alkington, Whitchurch. He also gave the address of his next of kin as 10 St. John`s Street, Whitchurch. This was his home at the time of his death in April 1939.

Employment: In 1915 was an agricultural labourer.

Died: In 1939 in Whitchurch and buried in Whitchurch Cemetery on 29 April 1939, aged 42.

Military Details

Regiment: Welsh Regiment  

Rank: Private

Service Number: 35502

Date of Enlistment: 12 December 1915

Date of Discharge: 3 July 1916

Reason for Discharge: Unlikely to become an efficient soldier, medical reasons

Medals and Awards

Not known

 

William Alexander Forster

King's Liverpool Regiment

Personal Details

Born: William Alexander Foster on 9 July 1878 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised 7 May 1879 in St. Alkmund’s Parish Church, Whitchurch. (The family name was changed from Foster to Forster between 1881 and 1891)

Family: He was the youngest of four children born to Alexander Marshall Foster, a blacksmith, and his wife Sarah (nee Stockton). He married Ruth Scott in 1907 in Whitchurch and was father to Joseph and Alick.

Residence: At the time of his baptism, the family were living in Waymills, Whitchurch; by 1881 they had moved to 92 New Road, West Derby, Lancashire. In 1891 he was living with his grandparents at Moss Road, Whitchurch and in 1901 was residing with his cousin in Edgeley Road, Edgeley, Whitchurch. In 1911 he lived at 34 Bargates, Whitchurch and by 1939 had moved to 60 Smallbrook Road, Whitchurch. He continued to live here for the rest of his life.

Employment: In 1901 he was a postman and in 1911 he was employed as a boot repairer. His discharge papers detail his occupation as labourer. In 1939 he was working as an engineer’s storeman.

Died: 30 March 1957 in Whitchurch, aged 78 and was buried on 3 April the same year in Whitchurch cemetery.

Military Details

Regiment: King’s Liverpool Regiment  

Rank: Private

Service Number: 74070

Date of Enlistment: 6 March 1916

Date of Discharge: 25 May 1917

Reason for Discharge: Being no longer physically fit for war service

Other Information: William had his left hand amputated which resulted in his discharge.

Medals and Awards

None awarded

 

William Crabtree

Royal Fusiliers

Personal Details

Born: In 1876 in Hebden Bridge, Yorkshire and was baptised on 22 December the same year in the Church of St. James and St. John, Hebden Bridge.

Family: He was the second of seven children born to Richard Crabtree, a butcher and his wife Hannah, nee Wadsworth. He married Eliza Sharpes on 25 April 1900 in Whitchurch, Shropshire. The couple had six children, William E W, Violet I, Muriel G E, George R A, Myra O E and Alfred.

Residence: In 1881 his family were living at 223 Bury New Road, Cheetham, Prestwich, Lancashire. In 1901 and now married he and his wife were at 227 Onslow Drive, Dennistoun, Glasgow, Lanarkshire. By 1911 they had moved to 57 Brudenell Road, Leeds, Yorkshire. At the time of his enlistment in 1915 the family were still in Leeds but at 5 Reginald Street, Chapeltown. When he was discharged from the Army in 1918 he gave his address as 29 Ael y Bryn, Garden Village, Wrexham, Denbighshire. At the time of his death in 1936 his home was 12 Hathershaw Lane, Oldham, Lancashire.

Employment: He was a butcher.

Died: 10 August 1936 at the Rous Memorial Hospital, Newmarket, Suffolk, aged 61.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Fusiliers 

Rank: Private

Service Number: G/28098

Date of Enlistment: 11 December 1915

Date of Discharge: 25 January 1918

Reason for Discharge: No longer physically fit for war service

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal) and the Silver War Badge (number 310825) issued 30 January 1918.

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Silver War Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.



 

Andrew Butterworth

Royal Army Veterinary Corps

Personal Details

Born: In 1879 in Oldham, Lancashire.

Family: He was the second of three children born to Edwin Butterworth, a carter, and his wife Louisa Jane (nee Purcell). Andrew married Annie Elizabeth Gill on 17 December 1899 in Nantwich, Cheshire and together they had three children – Annie, Harry and Alice M.

Residence: In 1881 he was living with his family at 3 Carlon Street, Royton, Oldham; by 1891 his mother (now a widow) and sisters were living at Bark Hill Yard, Bark Hill, Whitchurch, Shropshire whilst Andrew lived with his paternal grandfather in Oatwood Road, Stockport Etchells, Stockport, Cheshire. In 1901 his mother was living with her new husband and Andrew’s sisters at 13 Bark Hill, Whitchurch whilst Andrew, now married, was living with his wife and daughter at 16 Woodland Terrace, Monks Coppenhall, Crewe, Cheshire. The 1911 Census shows Andrew and his wife visiting 3 Pepper Street, Whitchurch. His military records show the 13 Bark Hill, Whitchurch address.

Employment: In 1901 he was a shunter in a railway works; in 1911 he was a domestic groom. His military records show him as a groom.

Died: In 1927 in Whitchurch, aged 48, and was buried on 13 August the same year in Whitchurch cemetery.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Army Veterinary Corps  

Rank: Private

Service Number: 31550

Date of Enlistment: 17 September 1917

Date of Discharge: 2 May 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

None awarded as did not serve overseas

 

Harry Allen

Royal Defence Corps

Personal Details

Born: 25 April 1898 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the youngest of three children born to Samuel and Alice (nee Ebrey) Allen. No marriage can be traced for Harry.

Residence: In 1901 and 1911 he lived with his family at the White Lion Pub, Ash Magna, Whitchurch, Shropshire where his mother was the landlady. In 1939 he lived at The Bungalow, Ash Lane, Ash, Whitchurch.

Employment: When he enlisted in 1916 he was a general labourer; in 1939 he was a cheese maker for United Dairy.

Died: In 1964 in Whitchurch, aged 66.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Defence Corps (previously East Lancashire Regiment – Accrington Pals) 

Rank: Private

Service Number: 86260 (previously 39589)

Date of Enlistment: 21 September 1916

Date of Discharge: Not known

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: Harry spent 88 days in the military hospital at York suffering with chest pains. On release in 1918 he was transferred to the Royal Defence Corps.

Medals and Awards

Harry was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Philip Batho

Labour Corps

Personal Details

Born: In 1888 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 23 September 1888 in Tilstock Parish Church, Shropshire.

Family: He was the youngest of six children born to Joseph Batho, an agricultural labourer, and his wife Caroline. He married Margaret Frances Beaman in 1912 in Whitchurch and together they had seven children – William, George, Gertrude, Violet, Constance, Nancy, and Philip.

Residence: From the time of his baptism until at least 1911 he was living with his family in Tilstock Village, Shropshire.

Employment: In 1911 he was a carter and farm labourer

Died: In 1924 in Whitchurch, aged 36.

Military Details

Regiment: Labour Corps  

Rank: Private

Service Number: 216311

Date of Enlistment: 16 February 1917

Date of Discharge: 10 August 1917

Reason for Discharge: No longer physically fit for service

Medals and Awards

None awarded as did not serve overseas

 

Peter William Ryder

Labour Corps

Personal Details

Born: In 1878 in Chorlton, Lancashire and baptised 30 June 1878 at St.George`s Parish Church, Hulme, Manchester.

Family: He was the elder of two children born to Harry Ryder, a painter and decorator and his wife Ellen, nee Walters. He married Ada Jessie Gardner, nee Barnett, a widow, on 8 December 1917 in Whitchurch, Shropshire. The couple had a daughter, Evelyn May, born in 1919 in Whitchurch. Ada had four children, Elsie, Alfred, Edward and Dorothy from her marriage to Frederick George Gardner.

Residence: In 1881 his family were living at 10 Rose Street, Salford, Lancashire. Ten years later they had moved to Crosscliffe Street, Moss Side, Manchester. By 1901 the family were living at 46 Raglan Street, Chorlton. In 1911 his address was 195 Withington Road, Whalley Range, Manchester. At the time of his Attestation in 1917 he gave his address as 59A Shaw Heath, Stockport, Cheshire. When he was demobilised in 1919 he was living at 4 Raven’s Yard, Watergate Street, Whitchurch, Shropshire.However by the time he was discharged from the Army Reserve in 1920 his home was 138 Frankwell, Shrewsbury, Shropshire. In 1939 he was living in the Tame Street Institution, Tame Street, Manchester.

Employment: He was a painter and decorator.

Died: In 1944 in Manchester, Lancashire, aged 64.

Military Details

Regiment: Labour Corps  

Rank: Private

Service Number: 331277

Date of Enlistment:  20 July 1917

Date of Discharge: 16 April 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: Peter enlisted again in the Labour Corps (700965) and served between 2 June 1919 and 11 February 1920, including exhumation duties on the Western Front. The military records indicate Peter was born in Whitchurch; this cannot be substantiated from the civil records.

Medals and Awards

None awarded; did not serve overseas

 

Edwin Davies Rogers

Labour Corps

Personal Details

Born: 28 March 1886 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 2 June 1886 at St Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the fifth of nine children born to Richard Rogers, an engineer and his wife Frances. He married Florence Challenor on 17 April 1911 at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch. The couple had one son, Percy Dean, born in 1912.

Residence: In 1891 he and his family were living at Old Farm, Fenns Bank, Whitchurch. By 1901 they had moved to the Waterworks at Fenns Bank. On his enlistment in 1916 he gave his address as 63 Brideoak Street, Cheetham, Manchester, Lancashire; however by 1921 he and his family had moved to 29 Windsor Road, Southport, Lancashire. In 1939 he was living at 13 Oakfield Avenue, Chester. At the time of his death in 1959 his home was 37 Portland Street, Southport, Lancashire.

Employment: In 1901 he was an assistant to the engine driver at the water works. In 1916 he was a motor coach fitter. By 1939 his occupation was a hardware chandler.

Died: 8 October 1959 at the Promenade Hospital, Southport, Lancashire, aged 73.

Military Details

Regiment: Labour Corps  

Rank: Sergeant

Service Number: 350830

Date of Enlistment: 9 May 1916

Date of Discharge: 18 October 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: He was posted to The King`s Liverpool Regiment on 4 January 1917 and remained there until 13 August 1917 when he was transferred to the Labour Corps. However there is no mention of the King`s Liverpool Regiment on his medal roll index card.

His brother Thomas William also served in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Edwin was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Frederick William Evanson

Labour Corps

Personal Details

Born: 18 November 1877 in Manchester, Lancashire and baptised on 21 January 1878 in the Parish Church of St. Mary, St. Denys and St. George, Manchester.

Family: He was the third of nine children born to William Evanson, a house painter, and his wife Elizabeth. He married Harriet Mary Stockton on the 20 April 1902 at St. Alkmund’s Parish Church, Whitchurch, Shropshire and was father to Benjamin Richard, William Henry, Emily, Nancy, Alyce Katherine, Tom, Adelaide, Ben, Ernest J and Violet.

Residence: In 1881 the Evanson family was living 7 Andrews Buildings, Harpurhey, Prestwich, Lancashire. By 1891 the family had moved to Chemistry Road, Whitchurch and in 1901 they resided at 33 High Street, Whitchurch. By 1911 Frederick had moved to 9 Castle Hill, Whitchurch. In 1939 he was living at 53 Naylor Street, Crewe, Cheshire.

Employment: Frederick followed in his father’s footsteps and became a house painter, a trade he continued throughout his life.

Died: In 1961 in Crewe, aged 83.

Military Details

Regiment: Labour Corps (previously East Lancashire Regiment and Devonshire Regiment) 

Rank: Private

Service Number: 172034 (previously 18976 and 38825)

Date of Enlistment: 16 February 1915

Date of Discharge: 19 March 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: In 1916, due to health problems he was discharged from front line duties and transferred home for garrison duties.

Medals and Awards

Frederick was awarded the Campaign Medals (1914/15 Star, British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Rowland Hill

Royal Engineers

Personal Details

Born: 7 October 1879 in Tattenhall, Cheshire.

Family: He was the youngest of four children born to Thomas Hill, a farmer, and his wife Mary. He married Sarah Jane Adams on 25 January 1904 in Tushingham Parish Church and was father to John, Lily and George.

Residence: In 1881 the family was living at Agden House, Agden, Cheshire and by 1901 they had moved to Hall Farm, Agden. By 1911 he had married and was living at Bradley Common, Bradley, Cheshire. At the time of his death he was living at Holly House, Bradley.

Employment: In 1901 he was employed on the family farm but by 1915 he had moved on and was working for Cheshire County Council as a road man. He continued in this role until at least 1939.

Died: 19 November 1962 at Beechcroft, Hampton, near Malpas, Cheshire, aged 84.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Engineers 

Rank: Pioneer

Service Number: WR/40202 (previously 225883)

Date of Enlistment: 7 December 1915 (transferred from Reserve 15 January 1917)

Date of Discharge: 1 August 1918

Reason for Discharge: No longer physically fit for war service

Other Information: In November 1917 he received gunshot wounds to his left thigh and right leg. He was entitled to wear a wound stripe.

Medals and Awards

Rowland was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal) and the Silver War Badge (number 381553)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Silver War Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.



 

Frederick Henry Slater

Royal Engineers

Personal Details

Born: In 1867 in Hartfield, Sussex.

Family: He was the youngest of at least five children born to John Slater, an agricultural labourer and his wife Jane. Frederick did not marry.

Residence: In 1871 he and his family were living at Kent Waters, Cowden, Sevenoaks, Kent. By 1881 they had moved to Cullinghurst Cottage, Hartfield, Sussex. He enlisted in the Royal Engineers in 1885 and in 1891 he was living in the barracks at Aldershot, Hampshire. In 1901 his address was Diglake, Tilstock, Shropshire. In 1911 he was living with his brother at The Bungalow, Higher Heath, Whitchurch, Shropshire. This was the address given for him on his enlistment in 1915. He was still living in Higher Heath at the time of his death in 1922.

Employment: In 1901 he was an electrical engineer but by 1911 he was a nurseryman. This continued to be his occupation until his death.

Died: 25 May 1922 in the Wem District of Shropshire, aged 56.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Engineers 

Rank: Lance Corporal

Service Number: 86871

Date of Enlistment: 24 March 1915

Date of Discharge: 9 July 1917

Reason for Discharge: No longer physically fit for war service

Other Information: Frederick had joined the Royal Engineers on 15 January 1885 and three years later he was sent to Egypt. Whilst there he was awarded the Khedive Star and the Egypt medal. He later became a theoretical instructor at the Chatham School of Army Signals. He served for 12 years before being discharged.

Medals and Awards

Frederick was awarded the Campaign Medals (1915 Star, British War medal and Victory medal) and the Silver War Badge (number 209580)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Silver War Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.



 

Edmund Mostyn Houghton

Royal Engineers

Personal Details

Born: 24 September 1896 in Ince, Cheshire and baptised 28 October 1896 in Ince Parish Church.

Family: He was the youngest of four children born to Edwin Houghton, a stud groom, and his wife Emily. No marriage can be traced for Edmund.

Residence: In 1901 the family lived at Hill Farm, Ince and in 1911 the family had moved to 30 Brook Lane, Chester, Cheshire. His military papers show his address as Hinton Hall, Whitchurch, Shropshire. In 1939 Edmund was living at Whitegates Farm, Cross Hill, Tarvin, Cheshire. At the time of his death he was residing at The Bungalow, Edge, near Malpas, Cheshire.

Employment: In 1911 and 1939 he was a clerk with London and North Western Railway Co.

Died: 8 July 1981 in Cheshire, aged 84 and was cremated in Cheshire on 14 July the same year.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Engineers 

Rank: Sapper

Service Number: WR/261771 (previously 210388)

Date of Enlistment: 29 November 1916

Date of Discharge: 20 October 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other information: His brother Thomas Edwin also served in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Edmund was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Arthur Gordon Hood

Royal Engineers

Personal Details

Born: 15 June 1896 in Ellesmere, Shropshire.

Family: He was the second of three sons born to John Hood, a commission agent, and his wife Mary Jane. He married Drusilla Viola Johnson on 6 April 1915 in St. Alkmund’s Parish Church, Whitchurch, Shropshire and was father to Reginald and Mary.

Residence: In 1901 and 1911 the family was living at 27 Brownlow Street, Ellesmere. In 1915 Arthur was living at Mountain View, Barnfield Road, Blaenavon, Pontypool, South Wales and in 1919 his address was Harcourt House, Brownlow Road, Ellesmere. In 1939 he was living at 3 Black Park Road, Whitchurch and continued to do so until his death.

Employment: In 1911 and 1939 he was a railway clerk. During the war he was a proficient telegraph operator.

Died: 17 April 1967 at the Cottage Hospital, Whitchurch, aged 71.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Engineers 

Rank: Private

Service Number: 321825

Date of Enlistment: 6 June 1916

Date of Discharge: 13 October 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: Although he signed up in 1916 he was not called up for service until 1917

Medals and Awards

Arthur was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Walter John Evans

Royal Engineers

Personal Details

Born: 27 November 1886 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 17 December 1886 in St. Alkmund’s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the fourth child of seven born to Stephen Charles Evans, a rural postman, and his wife Sarah Harriet. He married Elizabeth Davis on 11 April 1916 and became father to Florence Mary the daughter of Elizabeth from her previous marriage.

Residence: In 1891 the Evans family was living in St Johns Street, Whitchurch, Shropshire. By 1901 the family had moved to 14 Brownlow Street, Whitchurch. In 1911 Walter was in India with the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry and in 1912 had been transferred to the Reserve and was living at 30 Egerton Road, Whitchurch. In 1919 he was living at 243 West Street, Crewe and was still residing here in 1939.

Employment: In 1901 he was an ironmonger’s errand boy. By 1905 he was working as a farm labourer but then enlisted in the Army.  After leaving the army in 1912 he worked for London and North Western Railway Co. In 1939 he was working as a labourer for Crewe Town Council.

Died: Not known

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Engineers (previously King’s Shropshire Light Infantry)

Rank: Private

Service Number: 366575 (previously 7896)

Date of Enlistment: 23 January 1905

Date of Discharge: 22 March 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: In December 1910 he was the subject of a Regimental Court Martial for being drunk whilst being on guard and for leaving his post without orders. He was found guilty and was put under detention for 28 days and fined 10 shillings. In 1912 he was transferred to the Reserve, but recalled at the start of the war in 1914. On 22 April 1918 he received a gunshot wound to the abdomen.

Medals and Awards

Walter was awarded the Campaign Medals (1914 Star with clasp and roses, British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

George Beckett

Royal Army Service Corps

Personal Details

Born: 30 August 1895 in Whixall, Shropshire.

Family: He was the only child born to Ambrose Beckett, a labourer and his wife Mary, nee Harris. He married Winifred Cliff in 1919 in Whitchurch, Shropshire. The couple had two children, Eric born in 1920 and John A. born in 1932.

Residence: In 1901 his family were living at Whixall Moss, Whixall, Shropshire. By 1911 they had moved to Canal Side, Grindley Brook, Whitchurch. An electoral record for Autumn 1925 has an address of Ivy Cottage, Tushingham, near Whitchurch for him and his wife. In 1939 he was living at Agden, near Whitchurch. At the time of his death in 1967 his home was Roseleigh, Newhall, near Nantwich, Cheshire.

Education: He attended Whixall Primary School between 2 May 1901 and 13 March 1908.

Employment: In 1911 he was a telegram messenger, but on his enlistment in 1913 his occupation was described as a motor fitter. By 1939 he was a postman.

Died: 31 October 1967 at Whitchurch Cottage Hospital and buried at Whitchurch Cemetery on 4 November 1967, aged 72.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Army Service Corps (previously Cheshire Regiment)

Rank: Private

Service Number: 33787 (previously 9690)

Date of Enlistment: 30 September 1913

Date of Discharge: 16 February 1914

Reason for Discharge: Unfitted for the duties of the Corps

Medals and Awards

None awarded

 

John Woodward

Royal Army Service Corps

Personal Details

Born: 27 February 1879 in Duddon, Cheshire.

Family: He was the youngest of five children born to James Woodward, a joiner and his wife Ann. He married Elizabeth Richardson Miller on 12 December 1905 at Grosvenor Bank Baptist Church, Chester, Cheshire. The couple had five children, Ethel, Harry, Eva, John H and Alec. Sadly John died in 1915 and Eva in 1919.

Residence: From the time of his birth until at least 1901 he and his family were living in Duddon, near Tarvin, Cheshire. In 1911 and now married, his family were living at 56 Egerton Road, Whitchurch, Shropshire. An address of 11 Talbot Street, Whitchurch was given on his Attestation Documents. By 1939 he was living at 6 Yew Tree Bank, Tarvin, Cheshire.

Employment: In 1911 his occupation was a cartage contractor, as it was in 1915. In 1939 he was a roller driver working for Cheshire County Council.

Died: Not known

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Army Service Corps

Rank: Driver

Service Number: T/440666

Date of Enlistment: 12 December 1915

Date of Discharge: 26 July 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

Not known

 

Archibald John Cyril Taylor

Royal Army Service Corps

Personal Details

Born: 26 August 1897 in Stroud, Gloucestershire and baptised 10 October 1897 in Whiteshill, Gloucestershire.

Family: He was the eldest of four children born to Archibald John Taylor, a bootmaker and later a cycle and motor dealer and his wife Annie Elizabeth. He married Annie Hitchen in 1923 in Northwich, Cheshire.The couple had one child, Joyce F born in 1924.

Residence: At the time of his baptism in 1897 his family were living in Whiteshill, Gloucestershire. On the 1901 Census he, his mother and brother were living with his grandparents in North Street, Uppingham, Rutland, but his father was at 1 St John`s Street, Whitchurch, Shropshire. By 1911 the family were together at 21 St. Mary`s Street, Whitchurch. This was the address given for him on his military documents. By 1939 and married, he was living at the Hollies Hotel, Chester Road, Whitchurch, where his wife was described as the hotel keeper. In 1947 an address of the Victoria Hotel, Whitchurch was given for him and his wife on a passenger list of a ship sailing to Wellington, New Zealand. At the time of his death he was living at 1/7 The Parade, St. Helier’s Bay, Auckland, New Zealand.

Employment: On his Attestation in 1915 he was a motor driver. By 1939 he was a cycle agent.

Died: In 1973 in Auckland, aged 76, and was cremated at Purewa cemetery, Auckland on 13 December 1973.

Military Details

Regiment: King’s Shropshire Light Infantry for the first period of service and Royal Army Service Corps (previously Machine Gun Corps and King`s Shropshire Light Infantry) for the second 

Rank: Private

Service Number: 2679 for the first period of service and 397691 (previously 31198 and 19558) for the second

Date of Enlistment: 22 October 1914 and then re enlists 12 December 1915

Date of Discharge: 9 April 1915 for the first period of service and 19 September 1918 for the second

Reason for Discharge: Not likely to become an efficient soldier for the first period of service and no longer physically fit for war service for the second

Medals and Awards

Not known

 

Ernest Sayce Pugh

Royal Army Service Corps

Personal Details

Born: In 1888 in Shrewsbury, Shropshire.

Family: He was the fourth of ten children born to Jabez Pugh, a joiner and his wife Ann. He married Frances Allen on 1 October 1916 in Whitchurch Register Office, Whitchurch, Shropshire. No children can be found for the couple.

Residence: In 1891 and until at least 1901 he and his family were living at 11 Bynner Street, Shrewsbury, Shropshire. By 1911 he was a boarder at 26 Park Road, Whitchurch. On his Attestation in 1916 he and his wife were living at 19 St. Mary`s Street, Whitchurch. At the time of his death in 1919 his home was 13 St. John`s Street, Whitchurch.

Employment: He was a hairdresser.

Died: 11 February 1919 in Whitchurch and buried at Whitchurch Cemetery on 14 February 1919, aged 30.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Army Service Corps 

Rank: Private

Service Number: T/360159

Date of Enlistment: 9 December 1915

Date of Discharge: 24 January 1918

Reason for Discharge: No longer physically fit for war service

Medals and Awards

None awarded

 

William Hamer

Royal Army Service Corps

Personal Details

Born: In 1868 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 21 May 1868 in St. Alkmund’s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the fifth of seven children born to Edward Hamer, a tailor, and his wife Emma. No marriage can be traced for William.

Residence: At the time of his baptism, his family lived at ‘Blue Gates’, High Street, Whitchurch. By 1881 they had moved to Castle Hill, Whitchurch. In 1901 he was a boarder at 18 Newtown Street, Whitchurch and in 1918 was living at 14 Newtown Street, Whitchurch.

Employment: He was a general labourer and in 1918 was employed by Sharps, the Butchers, of Whitchurch.

Died: In 1929 at Deermoss House, Whitchurch, aged 59, and was buried on 16 April the same year in Whitchurch cemetery.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Army Service Corps 

Rank: Private

Service Number: 440975

Date of Enlistment: 18 April 1918

Date of Discharge: 11 February 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

None awarded

 

Richard Rowland Powell

Royal Army Service Corps

Personal Details

Born: 7 February 1880 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised 4 April 1880 at the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the eldest of at least five children born to Benjamin Blyth Powell, a draper and his wife Martha, nee Jones. He married Mary Ellen Cheshire on 24 February 1903 in Whitchurch. The couple had four children, Richard Roland, Frank, William Cyril and Dorris Mary.

Residence: In 1881 his family were living in Talbot Street, however in 1891 their address was Sandford Bridge, Newall, Cheshire. In 1911 and now married he was living at 11 Farm Lane, Fulham; this was the address stated on his Attestation in 1913. By 1939 the family were living at 21 Percy Street, Ilford, Essex. This continued to be his home until his death in 1953.

Employment: In 1911 he was a coachman and in 1913 a motor driver. In 1939 his occupation was a bus driver.

Died: 5 November 1953 at Oldchurch Hospital, Romford, Essex, aged 73.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Army Service Corps 

Rank: Private

Service Number: CMT/1407

Date of Enlistment: 22 April 1913

Date of Discharge: 26 April 1916

Reason for Discharge: Termination of Engagement

Medals and Awards

Richard was awarded the Campaign Medals (1914 Star, British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Frederick Parkinson Norton

Royal Army Service Corps

Personal Details

Born: 1 January 1884 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the youngest of eight children born to James Norton, a blacking manufacturer and his wife Elizabeth. He married Beatrice Hare on 23 March 1916 at the Unitarian Church, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire. No children can be found for the marriage.

Residence: In 1891 his family were living at Tilstock Lane, Tilstock, Shropshire. By 1901 his address was 58 High Street, Whitchurch, the home of his sister Alice. In 1911 he was boarding at North Street, Sutton in Ashfield, Nottinghamshire. At the time of his enlistment in 1915 he stated his address was The Shrubbery, New Street, Highgate, Whitchurch. This was the home of another sister, Elizabeth, who was married to Charles Prendergast. However at the time of his demobilisation in 1919 his address had changed again to 15 Kempson Road, Fulham SW6. From at least 1934 until 1939 he and his wife were living at 5 Victoria Road, Oswestry, Shropshire. At the time of his death in 1967 his home was 16 Thorn Avenue, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire.

Employment: In 1901 he was a clerk working for the railway, but by 1911 he stated that his occupation was a slipper manufacturer. This was also his occupation at the time of his marriage in 1916. In 1939 he was a clerk working for the Inland Revenue.

Died: 2 June 1967 in Mansfield, aged 83.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Army Service Corps 

Rank: Private

Service Number: M2/054770

Date of Enlistment: 23 March 1915

Date of Discharge: 1 August 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

Frederick was awarded the Campaign Medals (1915 Star, British War medal and Victory medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Samuel Brindley

Royal Army Service Corps

Personal Details

Born:  6 August 1890 in Bilston, Staffordshire.

Family: He was the youngest of three children born to Martha Brindley, a charwoman. He married Annie Holloway in 1937 in Bilston. No children can be found for the marriage.

Residence: In 1891 and in 1901 he, his widowed mother and siblings were living at 19 Stone Street, Bilston. By 1911 he was a boarder at Poplar Cottages, 24 Angel Street, Stourbridge, Worcestershire. On his Attestation in 1915 he gave his address as 1 New Street, Whitchurch, Shropshire, but on his discharge from the Army in 1919 his address was 1 Parkfields Colliery, Wolverhampton, Staffordshire. In 1939 he and his wife were living at Oak and Ivy Inn, Oxford Street, Bilston.

Employment: In 1911 he was a bricklayer`s labourer. By 1939 he was the manager of a public house.

Died: In 1964 in Bilston, aged 73.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Army Service Corps (previously Royal Field Artillery)

Rank: Driver

Service Number: M/398707 (previously 1904)

Date of Enlistment: 15 October 1915

Date of Discharge: 26 February 1919

Reason for Discharge: Disembodied

Medals and Awards

Samuel was awarded the Campaign Medals (British War medal and Victory medal) and the Silver War Badge (number B349055) on 24 December 1919.

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Silver War Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.



 

Thomas Plant

King's Shropshire Light Infantry

Personal Details

Born: About 1876 in Stanton upon Hine Heath, Shropshire.

Family: He was the son of Samuel Plant, a labourer.

Residence: In 1915 he gave his address as 4 Scotland Street, Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Employment: In 1915 he was a labourer.

Died: Not known

Military Details

Regiment: King’s Shropshire Light Infantry

Rank: Private

Service Number: 18661

Date of Enlistment: 26 July 1915

Date of Discharge: 4 September 1915

Reason for Discharge: Not likely to become an efficient soldier

Medals and Awards

None awarded

 

Ernest Woodhall

King's Shropshire Light Infantry

Personal Details

Born: 28 February 1879 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 13 March the same year in St. Alkmund’s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the sixth of seven children born to Charles Woodhall, a carpenter and joiner and his wife Eliza. He married Emily Crewe in 1908 in Whitchurch, Shropshire. The couple adopted two children, Colin (Bowen) born in 1912 and John (Mellor) born in 1918.

Residence: At the time of his baptism in 1879 and in 1881 he and his family were living at Havannah Buildings, Whitchurch. By 1891 the family had moved to 24 Claypit Street, Whitchurch and in 1901 they were living at 14 Pepper Street, Whitchurch. In 1911 and now married, he was living at 3 Liverpool Road, Whitchurch. This continued to be his home until his death in 1952. However, an address of 10 Park Terrace, Whittington Road, Oswestry, Shropshire was given for him on his pension index card in 1918.

Employment: In 1901 and 1911 his occupation was a bricklayer`s labourer and in 1939 a builder`s labourer.

Died: In 1952 in Whitchurch and buried on 20 December 1952 in Whitchurch Cemetery, aged 73.

Military Details

Regiment: King’s Shropshire Light Infantry

Rank: Private

Service Number: 200330 (previously 1764)

Date of Enlistment: 1 March 1913

Date of Discharge: 17 September 1918

Reason for Discharge: No longer physically fit for war service

Other Information: His brother, Thomas Woodhall, also fought in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Ernest was awarded the Campaign medals (British War Medal and Victory Medal), the Silver War Badge (number B2394) issued 10 September 1918 and the Territorial Force War Medal

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Silver War Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.



Territorial Force War Medal


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Territorial Force War Medal was a campaign medal awarded to members of the British Territorial Force and Territorial Force Nursing Services who served overseas in World War I; it is the rarest of the five British Great War medals.

The medal was established in April 1920 for award to members of the Territorial Force and Territorial Force Nursing Services who volunteered for service overseas on or before 30 September 1914, and served overseas. They had to have been serving with the force on 4 August 1914 or have completed four years service with the force before 4 August 1914 and rejoined the force on or before 30 September 1914.



 

Thomas Harry Spencer

King's Shropshire Light Infantry

Personal Details

Born: 1 November 1878 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised 31 January 1879 at St Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch. He was also known as Thomas Harry Croxon.

Family: He was the eldest of eleven children born to Samuel Spencer (also known as Croxon), a gas stoker and his wife Betsy. He married Louisa Rogers on 30 November 1909 at St Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch. The couple had two children, Elsie May, born in 1912 and Thomas Harry, born in 1919. Sadly Louisa died in 1928 and Thomas married Fanny Humphreys in 1931 in Oswestry, Shropshire.

Residence: In 1881 his family were living at 10 Yardington, Whitchurch but by 1891 they had moved to 37 Newtown, Whitchurch. This was the address he gave in 1901 when he enlisted in the Shropshire Light Infantry. At the time of his daughter`s baptism in 1912 the family were living at 18 Sherrymill Hill, Whitchurch. On his pension index card his address was 15 Nant-y-Caws, Morda, Oswestry, Shropshire. In 1939 his home was 3 Gronwen, Oswestry.

Employment: In 1891 he was a bricklayer`s labourer, but by the time of his marriage in 1909 he was a gas stoker. On the 1939 Register his occupation was given as a contractor`s labourer.

Died: In 1950 in Oswestry, Shropshire, aged 71.

Military Details

Regiment: King’s Shropshire Light Infantry

Rank: Private

Service Number: 6693

Date of Enlistment: 16 July 1901, transferred to the Army Reserve in 1904 and was re- engaged on 5 August 1914.

Date of Discharge: 22 March 1916

Reason for Discharge: No longer physically fit for war service.

Other Information: His brother Frederick (Croxon) also served in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Thomas was awarded the Campaign medals (1915 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal) and the Silver War Badge (number 504660) on 15 October 1920

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



Silver War Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.



 

Thomas Martin Loftus

King's Shropshire Light Infantry

Personal Details

Born: In 1886 in Crossmolina, County Mayo, Ireland. (the records differ as to his year of birth which could have been as early as 1874)

Family: He was the son of  Michael and Ellen Loftus. He married Emily Clewley on 8 March 1909 at St. George`s Roman Catholic Church, Whitchurch, Shropshire. They had ten children – Alice, Mary Ellen, Ann Catherine, Norah, Mary Jane, Josephine, Margaret, John T, William P and Bernard.

Residence: In 1911 he and his family were living at 5 Castle Hill, Whitchurch, Shropshire.  On his Attestation document an address of 8 Dodington, Whitchurch was given for him. By 1939 he was living at 30 George Street, Whitchurch. This continued to be his home until his death in 1951.

Employment: He was a farm labourer.

Died: In 1951 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and buried in Whitchurch Cemetery on 30 November 1951, aged 77.

Military Details

Regiment: King’s Shropshire Light Infantry

Rank: Private

Service Number: 18911

Date of Enlistment: 14 September 1915

Date of Discharge: 20 September 1916

Reason for Discharge: No longer physically fit for war service

Medals and Awards

Thomas was awarded the Silver War Badge number 505799 on 15 October 1920

Silver War Badge


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.



 

Samuel Colton Latham

King's Shropshire Light Infantry

Personal Details

Born: 6 November 1892 in Colton, Staffordshire and baptised at the Parish Church of Mary the Virgin, Colton, Staffordshire on 12 March 1893.

Family: He was the elder of two sons born to Samuel Colton Latham, a farmer and his wife Amelia, nee Baddeley. He married Bertha Annie Lawton on 5 December 1922 at Buxton Parish Church, Buxton, Derbyshire. They had one son Geoffrey S born in 1924 (possibly adopted).

Residence: At the time of his baptism his family were living in Colton, Staffordshire. By 1901 they had moved to Gorsey Bank Farm, Audlem Road, Woore, Shropshire. In 1903 an address of Smallbrook Road, Whitchurch, Shropshire was given for him on the Whitchurch Grammar School Admission Register. However by 1911 he was back living at Gorsey Bank Farm. At the time of his marriage in 1922 his address was East View, Market Drayton, Shropshire. In 1924 his family were living at 29 Charnwood Street, Derby but by 1939 they had moved to 2 Holt Avenue, Shardlow, Derbyshire. This continued to be his home until his death in 1968.

Education: He was admitted to Whitchurch Grammar School on 30 April 1903.

Employment: From 1911 until at least 1924 he was a farmer. In 1939 he was working in a plastics factory.

Died: 2 September 1968 at Derwent Hospital, Derby and buried 6 September the same year at Alvaston Parish Church, Alvaston, Derbyshire, aged 76.

Military Details

Regiment: King’s Shropshire Light Infantry

Rank: Private

Service Number: 16434

Date of Enlistment: 2 June 1915

Date of Discharge: 10 April 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

Samuel was awarded the Campaign medals (1915 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal)

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.



 

Edwin Charles Jenks

King's Shropshire Light Infantry

Personal Details

Born: 12 September 1887 in London, Middlesex.

Family: He was the eldest of six children born to Edwin Jenks, a stone sawyer and his wife Emma. He married Dora Beatrice Reed in 1922 in Whitchurch, Shropshire. The couple had one child, Geoffrey Frederick Claydon, born in 1923 in Whitchurch.

Residence: In 1891 he and his family were living in Sansaw Heath, Grinshill, Shropshire. By 1901 they had moved to Albert Place, Mill Fields, Wellington, Shropshire. At the time of the 1911 Census he was serving in India with the King`s Shropshire Light Infantry. His family`s address at this time was 19 Egerton Road, Whitchurch, Shropshire. In 1939 he and his wife were living at 22 Wellesley Road. Brentwood, Essex.

Employment: He was a postman for 34 years.

Died: 2 June 1973 in Deermoss Hospital, Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Military Details

Regiment: King’s Shropshire Light Infantry

Rank: Lance Corporal

Service Number: 8207

Date of Enlistment: Before 10 September 1914

Date of Discharge: Not known

Reason for Discharge: Not known

Other Information: His brother, Percy Jenks, also served in WW1.

Medals and Awards

Edwin was awarded the Military Medal and Campaign medals (1914 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal)

Military Medal

Campaign Medals


Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's servic