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http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk Researching the history of World War l relating to Whitchurch, Shropshire Thu, 17 Sep 2020 10:07:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.4 73299369 Ernest Samuel Povah http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/ernest-samuel-povah/ http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/ernest-samuel-povah/#respond Tue, 15 Sep 2020 12:40:31 +0000 http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/?p=22019 Personal Details Born: 15 September 1883 in Whitchurch, Shropshire. Family: He was the son of William Povah and his wife Mary, nee Pace. He married Harriet Jean Easton in Canada. They had a daughter, Dorothy. Residence: In 1891 he was …

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Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 15 September 1883 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Family: He was the son of William Povah and his wife Mary, nee Pace. He married Harriet Jean Easton in Canada. They had a daughter, Dorothy.

Residence: In 1891 he was living with his grandparents at 1 New Street, Whitchurch, Shropshire. He continued to live there until at least 1901. He emigrated to Canada in 1910 and in 1911 he was living at 211 Metcalfe, Ottawa, Ontario. When he enlisted in 1916 his address was Edison Avenue, Westboro, Ontario. At the time of his death in 1919 his home was 14 Chamberlain Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario.

Employment: In 1901 he was an ironmonger`s apprentice. By 1910 he had emigrated to  Canada and was employed as a janitor. In 1916 his occupation was a hardware salesman.

Died: 25 October 1919 at Mowat Sanatorium, Kingston, Ontario, aged 36.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force 

Rank: Private

Service Number: 246419

Date of Enlistment: 2 June 1916

Date of Discharge: 9 August 1916

Reason for Discharge: Medically unfit.

Other Information: On his Attestation documents he stated that he had served with the 53rd Shropshire Regiment King’s Shropshire Light Infantry for seven years and three years in the British Navy, but no military records can be found for him.

Medals and Awards

Ernest was not eligible for any medals.

 

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Edwin Morris Venables http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/edwin-morris-venables/ http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/edwin-morris-venables/#respond Tue, 15 Sep 2020 12:31:21 +0000 http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/?p=22016 Personal Details Born: 11 April 1870 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised 8 June the same year at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch. Family: He was the third of nine children born to William Venables, a grocer and his wife, Sarah …

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Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 11 April 1870 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised 8 June the same year at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the third of nine children born to William Venables, a grocer and his wife, Sarah Lucy, nee Hughes. He married Alberta Elizabeth Berney on 24 December 1900 in Winchester, Manitoba, Canada. The couple had four children, William Edwin, Evelene Beatrice, Lily May and Dorothy Lucy.

Residence: In 1871 his family were living in High Street, Whitchurch, Shropshire and in 1881 in Venables Yard, Whitchurch. He emigrated to Canada in 1885/6. In 1901 he and his wife were living in Brandon, Manitoba and between 1906 and 1911 their home was in Boissevain, Souris, Manitoba. In 1921 he was living in Sprague, Provencher, Manitoba.

Employment: In 1901 he was a farmer and in 1906 an agent in a lumber yard. On his enlistment in 1915 his occupation was a salesman, however on the 1921 Census he was a farmer.

Died: 15 November 1925 in Sprague, Manitoba, aged 55.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force 

Rank: Lance Corporal

Service Number: 151984

Date of Enlistment: 29 July 1915

Date of Discharge: 7 December 1918

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

Edwin was awarded the Victory Medal

Victory Medal

Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as ‘Wilfred’) was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal (‘Squeak’) also received the Victory Medal (‘Wilfred’). However, in general, all recipients of ‘Wilfred’ also received ‘Squeak’ and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as ‘Pip’) also received both ‘Squeak’ and ‘Wilfred’. The recipient’s service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

 

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Christopher Riley http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/christopher-riley/ http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/christopher-riley/#respond Tue, 15 Sep 2020 11:33:26 +0000 http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/?p=22013 Personal Details Born: 4 December 1896 in Ash, Shropshire. Family: He was the fifth of six children born to John Riley, a chauffeur (later a farmer in Canada) and his wife Helena Annie, nee Ely. He married Caroline Emily Marsh …

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Royal Flying Corps

Personal Details

Born: 4 December 1896 in Ash, Shropshire.

Family: He was the fifth of six children born to John Riley, a chauffeur (later a farmer in Canada) and his wife Helena Annie, nee Ely. He married Caroline Emily Marsh on 22 December 1928 in Spokane, Washington State, U.S.A. The couple had a daughter, Elizabeth Jean.

Residence: In 1901 his family were living in Ash Parva, Ash, Shropshire. They emigrated to Canada in March 1903. By 1911 their home was in Yale and Cariboo, British Columbia. In 1930 and now married, he and his wife were living at 5528 Dorchester Avenue, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. At the time of his death he was living in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Employment: At the time of his Attestation in 1917 he was a student.

Died: 23 March 1969 in Vancouver, British Columbia, aged 72.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Flying Corps. (previously Canadian Expeditionary Force (British Columbia Regiment))

Rank: Aviator Cadet (previously Private)

Service Number: 172563 (previously 2138582)

Date of Enlistment: 24 October 1917

Date of Discharge: 24 December 1918

Reason for Discharge: Being surplus to R.A.F. requirements

Other Information: His brother, William John, also served with the Canadian Expeditionary Force during WW1.

Medals and Awards

Christopher was awarded the Victory Medal

The Victory Medal

Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as ‘Wilfred’) was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal (‘Squeak’) also received the Victory Medal (‘Wilfred’). However, in general, all recipients of ‘Wilfred’ also received ‘Squeak’ and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as ‘Pip’) also received both ‘Squeak’ and ‘Wilfred’. The recipient’s service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

 

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Robert Mainwaring Wynne-Eyton http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/robert-mainwaring-wynne-eyton/ http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/robert-mainwaring-wynne-eyton/#respond Tue, 15 Sep 2020 11:06:13 +0000 http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/?p=22010 Personal Details Born: 12 January 1886 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised 19 February 1886 at St. Michael`s Parish Church, Marbury, Cheshire. Family: He was the third of five children born to Colonel Charles Edward Wynne-Eyton and his wife Aline Mary, …

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Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 12 January 1886 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised 19 February 1886 at St. Michael`s Parish Church, Marbury, Cheshire.

Family: He was the third of five children born to Colonel Charles Edward Wynne-Eyton and his wife Aline Mary, nee Wills. He married Leonora Bradfield, possibly in Nyasaland as no marriage record can be found in the UK records.

Residence: In 1891 his family were living at Plas Bellin Hall, Northop, Holywell, Flintshire. At the time of his enlistment in 1914 he was living in British Columbia, Canada. In the 1920s he was living in Nyasaland and at the time of his death in 1959 his home was Cape Town, Western Cape,South Africa.

Employment: In 1914 he was a rancher, in the 1920s a big game hunter and in 1938 a planter.

Died: 8 September 1959 in Cape Town, South Africa.

Military Details

Regiment: Royal Air Force (previously Royal Flying Corps, Machine Gun Corps, Royal Naval Auxiliary Service and Canadian Expeditionary Forces)

Rank: Flight Commander (at the end of his service)

Service Number: 107759 (Canadian Expeditionary Force)

Date of Enlistment: 16 November 1914

Date of Discharge: 23 January 1919

Reason for Discharge: Transferred to unemployed list

Other Information: He was wounded on active service in Salonica in 1917. In 1918 he was reported missing, taken prisoner in the Netherlands and repatriated on 15 November 1918.

Medals and Awards

Robert was awarded the Military Cross (London Gazette 1 January 1918) and Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals). He was also Mentioned in Dispatches.

Military Cross

Military_Cross

The Military Cross is the third-level military decoration awarded to officers and (since 1993) other ranks of the British Armed Forces, and used to be awarded to officers of other Commonwealth countries.
The Military Cross is granted in recognition of "an act or acts of exemplary gallantry during active operations against the enemy on land to all members, of any rank in Our Armed Forces". In 1979, the Queen approved a proposal that a number of awards, including the Military Cross, could be awarded posthumously.

Click on the tag below to see details of each recipient.


Campaign Medals

Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.


 

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Thomas Cappur Rolfe http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/thomas-cappur-rolfe/ http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/thomas-cappur-rolfe/#respond Tue, 15 Sep 2020 10:49:32 +0000 http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/?p=22008 Personal Details Born: 2 August 1887 in Halghton, Hanmer, Flintshire and baptised on 28 August 1887 at Hanmer Parish Church. Family: He was the sixth of seven children born to Samuel Gardiner Rolfe, a joiner and his wife Mary Ann, …

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Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 2 August 1887 in Halghton, Hanmer, Flintshire and baptised on 28 August 1887 at Hanmer Parish Church.

Family: He was the sixth of seven children born to Samuel Gardiner Rolfe, a joiner and his wife Mary Ann, nee Gardner. He married Blanche Closson on 15 December 1920 in Indian Head, Saskatchewan, Canada. The couple had three children, Thomas John, George Edward and Margaret.

Residence: From the time of his baptism in 1887 until at least 1901 his family were living at Tarts Hill, Halghton, Hanmer. It is possible that he emigrated to Canada in 1906. In 1921 and now married, he was living  at Indian Head, Qu`Appelle, Saskatchewan. His family was still there in 1926.

Employment: When he enlisted in 1915 he gave his occupation as a gardener. In 1921 he was a farmer.

Died: 9 October 1952, aged 65 and buried in the Veterans Garden, Regina Cemetery, Regina, Saskatchewan.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Machine Gun Corps.)

Rank: Sergeant

Service Number: 104941

Date of Enlistment: 22 September 1915

Date of Discharge: 26 March 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Medals and Awards

Thomas was awarded the Military Medal (London Gazette 2 April 1918) and Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals)

His Military Medal citation read: “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on January 22nd 1918. Under an intense bombardment the enemy attempted to raid our lines. L/Cpl Rolfe’s number 1 on his machine gun opened up, and maintained a heavy fire on the two parties of the enemy, breaking up their attack and forcing them to retire. Throughout the action he displayed great coolness and courage and set a splendid example to his men.“

Military Medal

Until 1993, the Military Medal (MM) was a military decoration awarded to personnel of the British Army and other services, and formerly also to personnel of other Commonwealth countries, below commissioned rank, for bravery in battle on land.
The medal was established on 25 March 1916. It was the other ranks' equivalent to the Military Cross (MC), which was awarded to commissioned officers and, rarely, to warrant officers, although WOs could also be awarded the MM. The MM ranked below the Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM), which was also awarded to non-commissioned members of the Army.
Click on the tags below to see details of each recipient.


Campaign Medals

Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.


 

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William John Riley http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/william-john-riley/ http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/william-john-riley/#respond Tue, 15 Sep 2020 10:35:37 +0000 http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/?p=22004 Personal Details Born: 8 July 1886 in Ingatestone, Mountnessing, Essex and baptised on 25 July 1886 in Essex. Family: He was the eldest of six children born to John Riley, a coachman (later a farmer in Canada) and his wife …

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William John Riley

Personal Details

Born: 8 July 1886 in Ingatestone, Mountnessing, Essex and baptised on 25 July 1886 in Essex.

Family: He was the eldest of six children born to John Riley, a coachman (later a farmer in Canada) and his wife Helena Annie, nee Ely. He married Beatrice May Hood – Barrs on 29 April 1922 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The couple had a son, Michael born in 1923.

Residence: In 1891 his family were living at Broughall House Lodge, Broughall, Shropshire. By 1901 they had moved to Ash Wood Lane, Ash Parva, Shropshire. The family emigrated to Canada in 1903 and at the time of his Attestation in 1914 he gave an address of Celista, British Columbia. In 1921 his home was Celista, Shuswap Lake, Cariboo, British Columbia. He and his wife were living at 4495 Marine Drive East, Vancouver, British Columbia in 1935.

Employment: In 1914 he was a saddler and in 1921 a farmer. By 1935 he was a manager for an export company.

Died: 8 April 1937 in Vancouver, British Columbia, aged 50.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Railway Troop, previously 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles)

Rank: Acting Captain (previously Trooper)

Service Number: 107513

Date of Enlistment: 8 December 1914

Date of Discharge: 1 September 1920

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: In September 1916, whilst serving in France, he suffered a gunshot wound to his face. His brother Christopher, also served with the Canadian Expeditionary Force during WW1.

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the Military Cross (London Gazette 23 July 1918), Military Medal (London Gazette 6 January 1917) and bar (London Gazette 23 February 1918) and Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals)

His citation for his Military Cross reads: ‘ For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in attempting to save two 12 inch railway howitzers, and in saving a locomotive which would have fallen into the hands of the enemy. A number of breaks had to be repaired, and at one part of the journey the engine had to be taken over an 8 inch break in the rails. In spite of heavy machine gun and rifle fire he was successful, and the engine was then used to haul a trainload of material. He showed great courage under very trying conditions.’ The entry in the London Gazette reads: ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He kept the guns of the forward section in action under intense fire for seven hours, firing 800 rounds from two guns. He only retired when the enemy opened machine gun fire at 150 yards, first putting his guns out of actions, and getting his men away with a minimum of loss.’

His citation for his first Military Medal reads: ‘During the whole of operations from September 27th and 28th until relieved this NCO obtained valuable information, particularly by getting in touch with elements of the company on our right, when machine gun fire was most intense. About 6 pm on the afternoon of the 29th the right flank of A Company was ‘in the air’ and the enemy making every endeavour to force our block. It was seen that a gap connecting the Company right flank with elements of B Company was necessary, the position of either not being known to the other. Cpl Riley took a bundle of stakes and a shovel and under heavy rifle and machine gun fire staked out about seventy feet of trench, which was dug and consolidated thus ensuring the safety of our flank.’

Military Cross

Military_Cross

The Military Cross is the third-level military decoration awarded to officers and (since 1993) other ranks of the British Armed Forces, and used to be awarded to officers of other Commonwealth countries.
The Military Cross is granted in recognition of "an act or acts of exemplary gallantry during active operations against the enemy on land to all members, of any rank in Our Armed Forces". In 1979, the Queen approved a proposal that a number of awards, including the Military Cross, could be awarded posthumously.

Click on the tag below to see details of each recipient.


Military Medal

Until 1993, the Military Medal (MM) was a military decoration awarded to personnel of the British Army and other services, and formerly also to personnel of other Commonwealth countries, below commissioned rank, for bravery in battle on land.
The medal was established on 25 March 1916. It was the other ranks' equivalent to the Military Cross (MC), which was awarded to commissioned officers and, rarely, to warrant officers, although WOs could also be awarded the MM. The MM ranked below the Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM), which was also awarded to non-commissioned members of the Army.
Click on the tags below to see details of each recipient.


Campaign Medals

Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.


 

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John Furber http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/john-furber/ http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/john-furber/#respond Tue, 15 Sep 2020 10:19:41 +0000 http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/?p=22001 Personal Details Born: 12 June 1890 in Prees, Shropshire and baptised at St.Chad`s Church, Prees. Family: He was the younger of two sons born to Elizabeth Ann Furber. At the time of his birth she was unmarried. His mother subsequently …

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Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 12 June 1890 in Prees, Shropshire and baptised at St.Chad`s Church, Prees.

Family: He was the younger of two sons born to Elizabeth Ann Furber. At the time of his birth she was unmarried. His mother subsequently married Thomas Bate and together they had nine surviving children, John’s half siblings. He was brought up by Joseph Hockenhull, an agricultural labourer and his wife, Hannah. He married Violet Ruth Emmaline Sutton on 23 September 1926 in Timiskaming, Ontario, Canada. Sadly the couple were only married for two months before he died. No children can be found for the couple.

Residence: In 1891 he was living in Hollins Lane, Tilstock, Shropshire and in 1901 in Alkington, near Whitchurch. He emigrated to Canada in 1913, arriving on 11 April. When he was discharged from the Army in 1919 his address was Cemetery Hill, New Liskeard, Ontario. At the time of his death in 1926 he was living in Timiskaming, Ontario.

Employment: At the time of his enlistment in 1915 his occupation was said to have been a labourer. On his return to Canada in 1920 he was a farm labourer. In 1926 he was a gold miner.

Died: 17 November 1926, as a result of an accident at Tough Dakes Mine. He died in Kirkland Lake Hospital, Timiskaming, Ontario, aged 36.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Machine Gun Corps.)

Rank: Sergeant

Service Number: 47858

Date of Enlistment: 28 May 1915

Date of Discharge: 12 April 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation in England

Medals and Awards

John was awarded the Military Medal (London Gazette 14 December 1917) and Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals)

His Military Medal citation read: 'For great presence of mind and gallantry on August 15 1917. This NCO showed remarkable courage and initiative in leading his crew and consolidating his position. He set his men a fine example during counter-attacks by his coolness and devotion to duty.’

Military Medal

Until 1993, the Military Medal (MM) was a military decoration awarded to personnel of the British Army and other services, and formerly also to personnel of other Commonwealth countries, below commissioned rank, for bravery in battle on land.
The medal was established on 25 March 1916. It was the other ranks' equivalent to the Military Cross (MC), which was awarded to commissioned officers and, rarely, to warrant officers, although WOs could also be awarded the MM. The MM ranked below the Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM), which was also awarded to non-commissioned members of the Army.
Click on the tags below to see details of each recipient.


Campaign Medals

Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.


 

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George Nunnerley http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/george-nunnerley/ http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/george-nunnerley/#respond Tue, 15 Sep 2020 09:33:44 +0000 http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/?p=21999 Personal Details Born: 26 March 1887 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 11 October 1887 at St Alkmund`s Church, Whitchurch. Family: He was the youngest of six children born to Thomas Nunnerley, a farmer and his wife Mary Ann, nee …

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Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 26 March 1887 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 11 October 1887 at St Alkmund`s Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the youngest of six children born to Thomas Nunnerley, a farmer and his wife Mary Ann, nee Pearson. He married Maggie Leslie Plumb on 2 August 1933 in Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. The couple had one child.

Residence: From the time of his baptism until at least 1911 his family were living at Bradeley Green, Wirswall, Whitchurch, Shropshire. An address of 16 Kitchener Court, McMillan Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada was given for him when he was discharged from the Army in 1919.

Employment: In 1911 he was a dairy manager and in 1914, a creamery manager.

Died: 11 October 1954 in Manitoba, Canada, aged 67.

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Royal Canadian Dragoons)

Rank: Trooper

Service Number: 14516

Date of Enlistment: 24 September 1914

Date of Discharge: 28 February 1919

Reason for Discharge: Demobilisation

Other Information: His brother, Arthur, also served in WW1 and died of wounds in Belgium on 27 April 1915, aged 29. His brother, John Edward, served in the Boer War.

Medals and Awards

George was awarded the Campaign medals (1914 Star, Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals

Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.


 

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William Roberts http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/william-roberts-2/ http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/william-roberts-2/#respond Tue, 15 Sep 2020 09:25:53 +0000 http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/?p=21996 Personal Details Born: 29 April 1889 in Moreton Say, Shropshire and baptised on 26 May 1889 in Moreton Say Parish Church. Family: He was one of six surviving children born to Henry Roberts, an agricultural worker and his wife Martha. …

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Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 29 April 1889 in Moreton Say, Shropshire and baptised on 26 May 1889 in Moreton Say Parish Church.

Family: He was one of six surviving children born to Henry Roberts, an agricultural worker and his wife Martha. He married Mary Jane Stewart on 5 December 1915 in Gateshead, Co Durham. They had a daughter, Mary S, born in 1916 in Whitchurch, Shropshire.

Residence: In 1891 his family were living at New Street Lane, Moreton Say, Shropshire, but ten years later they had moved to Maerfield, Maer, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire. In 1911 the family were living at Mossfield Cottages, Whitchurch, Shropshire. He enlisted in Edmonton, Canada in 1915 and there is an address of Torryburn, St John, New Brunswick on his records. On his discharge from the army in 1919 he gave  his address as Mossfields Cottages, Whitchurch, Shropshire. It would appear from his records that he did not intend going back to Canada. However he returned to Canada on 31 December 1919 and emigrated to the United States of America on 24 September 1922; his last address in Canada was in St. John. He became a naturalised American on 29 March 1941 and was living at 165 Elm Street, Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts in 1942.

Employment: On his Attestation documents he gave his occupation as a farmer; in 1925 he was a machinist.

Died: Not known

Military Details

Regiment: Canadian Expeditionary Force (Canadian Army Service Corps.)

Rank:  Private

Service Number: 436207

Date of Enlistment: 6 January 1915

Date of Discharge: 30 June 1919

Reason for Discharge: Not known

Other Information: He suffered severe gunshot wound to his back in 1915, whilst serving in France.

Medals and Awards

William was awarded the Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals

Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.


 

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Frederick Maddock http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/frederick-maddock/ http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/frederick-maddock/#respond Thu, 10 Sep 2020 13:56:58 +0000 http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/?p=21990 Personal Details Born: 4 November 1889 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 4 December 1889 at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch. Family: He was the eldest of five surviving children born to Daniel Maddock, an engine cleaner and his wife …

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Canadian Expeditionary Force

Personal Details

Born: 4 November 1889 in Whitchurch, Shropshire and baptised on 4 December 1889 at St. Alkmund`s Parish Church, Whitchurch.

Family: He was the eldest of five surviving children born to Daniel Maddock, an engine cleaner and his wife Mary Ellen, nee Ray. He married Minnie Jane Brown on 24 May 1920 at St. Barnabas Church, Toronto, Ontario. Frederick and Minnie had seven children – Frederick Daniel (who was killed in action in WW2), Clifford, Gordon, Leslie, Maude, Viola and Shirley.

Residence: At the time of his baptism in 1889 his family were living in Bark Hill, Whitchurch but two years later they had moved to Green End, Whitchurch. In 1901 their address was 11 Egerton Road, Whitchurch. By 1919 he was living at 200 Christy Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. At the time of his death in 1942 his home was 397 Lawrence Street, Oshawa, Ontario.

Employment: In 1915 he was a labourer on the railroad. In 1942 he was a guard at a munitions plant.

Died: 10 April 1942 at Christie Street Hospital, Toronto and buried 13 April the same year at the Oshawa Union Cemetery, Oshawa, Ontario, aged 52.

Military Details

Regiment: 20th Battalion Canadian Expeditionary Force (1st Central Ontario Regiment)

Rank:  Private

Service Number: 58216

Date of Enlistment: 9 April 1915

Date of Discharge: 31 August 1917

Reason for Discharge: Permanently unfit

Other Information: In September 1916 he was blown up and buried by shell fire, leaving him unconscious, resulting in severe shell shock.

Medals and Awards

Frederick was awarded the Campaign medals (1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals)

Campaign Medals

Great War History Hub Whitchurch Shropshire Medals Front Image

The 1914 Star (also known as 'Pip') was authorised under Special Army Order no. 350 in November 1917 and by an Admiralty Fleet Order in 1918, for award to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who served in France or Belgium between 5 August and midnight of 22–23 November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

The 1914–15 Star (also known as 'Pip') was instituted in December 1918 and was awarded to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served against the Central European Powers in any theatre of the Great War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The period of eligibility was prior to the introduction of the Military Service Act 1916, which instituted conscription in Britain.

The British War Medal (also known as 'Squeak') was a silver or bronze medal awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920. Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.

The Allied Victory Medal (also known as 'Wilfred') was issued by each of the allies. It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon. The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory. Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of The 1914 Star or The 1914/1915 Star (also known as 'Pip') also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.


 

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